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This work relates the first-hand impressions of the author, which he gathered during his illustrious career, starting with Quaid-i-Azam M.A. Jinnah up until the rule of General Pervez Musharraf. A lifetime in the diplomatic service of Pakistan gave Jamsheed Marker a unique vantage point-in cricket terms, he was at cover point, i.e. near enough to the wicket to follow the action around the stumps...yet sufficiently distant for a general overview of the state of play.

Produktbeschreibung
This work relates the first-hand impressions of the author, which he gathered during his illustrious career, starting with Quaid-i-Azam M.A. Jinnah up until the rule of General Pervez Musharraf. A lifetime in the diplomatic service of Pakistan gave Jamsheed Marker a unique vantage point-in cricket terms, he was at cover point, i.e. near enough to the wicket to follow the action around the stumps...yet sufficiently distant for a general overview of the state of play.
Autorenporträt
Jamsheed Marker (1922-2018) was a distinguished veteran Pakistani diplomat from a well-known Parsee family of Quetta and Karachi. Born in 1922 at Hyderabad Deccan, India, he received his education from the Doon School, Dehradun and Forman Christian College, Lahore. During the Second World War he served as an officer in the Royal Indian Naval Volunteer Reserve. When the war ended, Marker joined his family business. He served on the boards of several public and private corporations in banking, insurance, and shipping. In April 1965, Marker was appointed as high commissioner of Pakistan to Ghana. Over a 42-year diplomatic career, Mr Marker served as ambassador continuously in ten posts, including in the US (1986-1989) and at the UN (1990-1994). In 1986, as ambassador to the US, he helped negotiate the Soviet military withdrawal from Afghanistan. At the UN, he served as Chair, Security Council; Special Advisor to the Secretary General Kofi Annan; and Special Envoy to East Timor in 1999.