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  • Broschiertes Buch

This book has two main aims: a) to develop a list of technical words used frequently in English language teaching and learning (ELTL) research articles (RAs) for applied linguistics students and later compare the coverage of those words in British National Corpus, and b) to identify the collocational patterns of eight highest frequent general and technical key and analyze them in terms of collocation, colligation, semantic association, and pragmatic association. The corpus-based analysis of research articles revealed that applied linguistics researchers have a strong tendency towards making…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This book has two main aims: a) to develop a list of technical words used frequently in English language teaching and learning (ELTL) research articles (RAs) for applied linguistics students and later compare the coverage of those words in British National Corpus, and b) to identify the collocational patterns of eight highest frequent general and technical key and analyze them in terms of collocation, colligation, semantic association, and pragmatic association. The corpus-based analysis of research articles revealed that applied linguistics researchers have a strong tendency towards making frequent use of not only technical word families in their RAs, but also, General Service List lemma words in their RAs and only a minimal coverage of the most-frequent technical lemma words extracted from the sample ELTL RAs was observed in BNC. Collocational patterns of the key words were found to be mainly associated with academic genre. Reading this book will be useful for the development of EFL researchers and students' collocational competence by including teaching lexical collocations in their course books and preparing them to use collocations effectively and appropriately.
Autorenporträt
Asadi, BitaBita Asadi, PhD in TESOL, is an experienced EFL teacher and ESP lecturer from Urmia, Iran. Her research interests are incidental focus on form and interaction enhancement in task-based language teaching.