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Focusing on service-providing organizations established by health and human service professionals in post-Communist Poland, this book adds a new dimension to the sociological study of voluntary organizations. The author investigates the motives and interests of the people who establish these organizations and the connections among organizational forms, the social organizations of production, and the occupational interests of professional service providers.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Focusing on service-providing organizations established by health and human service professionals in post-Communist Poland, this book adds a new dimension to the sociological study of voluntary organizations. The author investigates the motives and interests of the people who establish these organizations and the connections among organizational forms, the social organizations of production, and the occupational interests of professional service providers.
Rezensionen
` ...This argument is convincing and is based on both quantitative data drawn from a large sample of nonprofit organizations and qualitative evidence from the author's own in-depth interviews with 14 such agencies. The book will be of interest to both Eastern European specialists and organizational sociologists, and it contributes to both fields.'
American Journal of Sociology, 107:2 (September 2001)
'The book is likely to appeal to those working in organizational theory and economic sociology, especially those interested in economic embeddedness and theories of public good. For those interested in the voluntary sector in postcommunist Eastern Europe [uthor pulls together the large amount of highly detailed information from the previous chapters and uses it in his final chapter to reflect on theories of social change, the idea of professional projects, and theories of economic action.'
Contemporary Sociology, 31 (2002)
` ...This argument is convincing and is based on both quantitative data drawn from a large sample of nonprofit organizations and qualitative evidence from the author's own in-depth interviews with 14 such agencies. The book will be of interest to both Eastern European specialists and organizational sociologists, and it contributes to both fields.'
American Journal of Sociology, 107:2 (September 2001)
'The book is likely to appeal to those working in organizational theory and economic sociology, especially those interested in economic embeddedness and theories of public good. For those interested in the voluntary sector in postcommunist Eastern Europe [uthor pulls together the large amount of highly detailed information from the previous chapters and uses it in his final chapter to reflect on theories of social change, the idea of professional projects, and theories of economic action.'
Contemporary Sociology, 31 (2002)