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Be it known that The Tar Baby, while just as jovial but much randier, has nothing to do with Uncle Remus. It's the quarterly of a little, very literary magazine of Galapagos Junior College (California) and this book will appear with some eye-catching visual effects beginning with the little black bare-assed boy with cheeks who is just as well off without a diaper considering the number of referrals to what it might have been loaded with. This particular issue is a memorial to Anatole Waxman-Weissman, 1931-1972, a lexicographer and logomachist who devoted his life to variant versions of a work…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Be it known that The Tar Baby, while just as jovial but much randier, has nothing to do with Uncle Remus. It's the quarterly of a little, very literary magazine of Galapagos Junior College (California) and this book will appear with some eye-catching visual effects beginning with the little black bare-assed boy with cheeks who is just as well off without a diaper considering the number of referrals to what it might have been loaded with. This particular issue is a memorial to Anatole Waxman-Weissman, 1931-1972, a lexicographer and logomachist who devoted his life to variant versions of a work (full of "cloacal musings") on Wittgenstein before he ended it by walking into a bus (deliberately?). The issue contains comments on both the contribution of this "booby hatch philosopher" as well as his early on rite de passage in the hands of the ladies in a nearby motel bordello - he marries the daughter of its housemother who runs off with a plumber. Along with a good deal of infighting among departmental thick heads as well as the brawling of the natives, this is tilled in via bits and pieces - pieces which might include anything from a recipe for turtle pie to an account of the Tong War of 1858. Will there be any exegetes? It's hard to say since the level is quite high and quite low at the same time - think of it as both scatologica slapstick and an academic sendup which is funny, in spots. (Kirkus Reviews)
Autorenporträt
A Guggenheim Fellow, Jerome Charyn has taught at Stanford, Rice, and Princeton, and is currently teaching film history at the American University of Paris. Death of a Tango King is his twenty-eighth novel.