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Provides an up-to-date, in-depth look at the currentresearch, design, and implementation of cooperative vehicle safetycommunication protocols and technology Improving traffic safety has been a top concern fortransportation agencies around the world and the focus of heavyresearch and development efforts sponsored by both governments andprivate industries. Cooperative vehicle systems--which usesensors and wireless technologies to reduce trafficaccidents--can play a major role in making the world's roadssafer. Vehicle Safety Communications: Protocols, Security, andPrivacy describes fundamental…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Provides an up-to-date, in-depth look at the currentresearch, design, and implementation of cooperative vehicle safetycommunication protocols and technology Improving traffic safety has been a top concern fortransportation agencies around the world and the focus of heavyresearch and development efforts sponsored by both governments andprivate industries. Cooperative vehicle systems--which usesensors and wireless technologies to reduce trafficaccidents--can play a major role in making the world's roadssafer. Vehicle Safety Communications: Protocols, Security, andPrivacy describes fundamental issues in cooperative vehiclesafety and recent advances in technologies for enabling cooperativevehicle safety. It gives an overview of traditional vehicle safetyissues, the evolution of vehicle safety technologies, and the needfor cooperative systems where vehicles work together to reduce thenumber of crashes or mitigate damage when crashes becomeunavoidable. Authored by two top industry professionals, the book: * Summarizes the history and current status of 5.9 GHz DedicatedShort Range Communications (DSRC) technology and standardization,discussing key issues in applying DSRC to support cooperativevehicle safety * Features an in-depth overview of on-board equipment (OBE) androadside equipment (RSE) by describing sample designs to illustratethe key issues and potential solutions * Takes on security and privacy protection requirements andchallenges, including how to design privacy-preserving digitalcertificate management systems and how to evict misbehavingvehicles * Includes coverage of vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I)communications like intersection collision avoidance applicationsand vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) communications like extendedelectronic brake lights and intersection movement assist Vehicle Safety Communications is ideal for anyone workingin the areas of--or studying--cooperative vehicle safetyand vehicle communications.

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  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: John Wiley & Sons
  • Seitenzahl: 400
  • Erscheinungstermin: 5. September 2012
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9781118452219
  • Artikelnr.: 37353051
Autorenporträt
LUCA DELGROSSI, PhD, is Director of Driver Assistance andChassis Systems U.S. at Mercedes-Benz Research & DevelopmentNorth America, Inc., Chairman of the Board of Directors at the VIIConsortium, and coeditor of the IEEE Communications MagazineAutomotive Networking Series. TAO ZHANG, PhD, is Chief Scientist for Smart ConnectedVehicles at Cisco Systems. He is a Fellow of the IEEE and thecoauthor of IP-Based Next-Generation Wireless Networks.
Inhaltsangabe
Foreword xv Ralf G. Herrtwich Foreword xvii Flavio Bonomi Foreword xix Adam Drobot Preface xxi Acknowledgments xxv 1 Traffic Safety 1 1.1 Traffic Safety Facts 1 1.2 European Union 5 1.3 Japan 7 1.4 Developing Countries 7 References 8 2 Automotive Safety Evolution 10 2.1 Passive Safety 10 2.2 Active Safety 12 2.3 Advanced Driver Assistance Systems 14 2.4 Cooperative Safety 17 References 18 3 Vehicle Architectures 20 3.1 Electronic Control Units 20 3.2 Vehicle Sensors 21 3.3 Onboard Communication Networks 22 3.4 Vehicle Data 25 3.5 Vehicle Data Security 26 3.6 Vehicle Positioning 27 References 30 4 Connected Vehicles 32 4.1 Connected Vehicle Applications 32 4.2 Uniqueness in Consumer Vehicle Networks 34 4.3 Vehicle Communication Modes 36 4.4 Wireless Communications Technology for Vehicles 39 References 42 5 Dedicated Short
Range Communications 44 5.1 The 5.9 GHz Spectrum 44 5.2 DSRC in the European Union 46 5.3 DSRC in Japan 47 5.4 DSRC Standards 48 References 50 6 WAVE Physical Layer 52 6.1 Physical Layer Operations 52 6.2 PHY Amendments 55 6.3 PHY Layer Modeling 57 References 62 7 WAVE Media Access Control Layer 64 7.1 Media Access Control Layer Operations 64 7.2 MAC Layer Amendments 66 7.3 MAC Layer Modeling 67 7.4 Overhauled ns
2 Implementation 72 References 74 8 DSRC Data Rates 75 8.1 Introduction 75 8.2 Communication Density 76 8.3 Optimal Data Rate 85 References 91 9 WAVE Upper Layers 93 9.1 Introduction 93 9.2 DSRC Multichannel Operations 94 9.3 Protocol Evaluation 97 9.4 WAVE Short Message Protocol 103 References 104 10 Vehicle
to
Infrastructure Safety Applications 106 10.1 Intersection Crashes 106 10.2 Cooperative Intersection Collision Avoidance System for Violations 107 10.3 Integrated Safety Demonstration 118 References 124 11 Vehicle
to
Vehicle Safety Applications 126 11.1 Cooperation among Vehicles 126 11.2 V2V Safety Applications 127 11.3 V2V Safety Applications Design 128 11.4 System Implementation 135 11.5 System Testing 138 References 140 12 DSRC Scalability 141 12.1 Introduction 141 12.2 DSRC Data Traffic 142 12.3 Congestion Control Algorithms 145 12.4 Conclusions 148 References 149 13 Security and Privacy Threats and Requirements 151 13.1 Introduction 151 13.2 Adversaries 151 13.3 Security Threats 152 13.4 Privacy Threats 155 13.5 Basic Security Capabilities 159 13.6 Privacy Protections Capabilities 161 13.7 Design and Performance Considerations 161 References 165 14 Cryptographic Mechanisms 167 14.1 Introduction 167 14.2 Categories of Cryptographic Mechanisms 167 14.3 Digital Signature Algorithms 172 14.4 Message Authentication and Message Integrity Verifi cation 196 14.5 Diffi e
Hellman Key Establishment Protocol 200 14.6 Elliptic Curve Integrated Encryption Scheme (ECIES) 202 References 206 15 Public Key Infrastructure for Vehicle Networks 209 15.1 Introduction 209 15.2 Public Key Certificates 210 15.3 Message Authentication with Certificates 211 15.4 Certifi cate Revocation List 212 15.5 A Baseline Reference Vehicular PKI Model 213 15.6 Confi gure Initial Security Parameters and Assign Initial Certificates 215 15.7 Acquire New Keys and Certifi cates 217 15.8 Distribute Certifi cates to Vehicles for Signature Verifications 220 15.9 Detect Misused Certifi cates and Misbehaving Vehicles 222 15.10 Ways for Vehicles to Acquire CRLs 226 15.11 How Often CRLs should be Distributed to Vehicles? 228 15.12 PKI Hierarchy 230 15.13 Privacy
Preserving Vehicular PKI 233 References 235 16 Privacy Protection with Shared Certificates 237 16.1 Shared Certificates 237 16.2 The Combinatorial Certificate Scheme 237 16.3 Certificate Revocation Collateral Damage 239 16.4 Certified Intervals 242 16.5 Reduce Collateral Damage and Improve Certified Interval 244 16.6 Privacy in Low Vehicle Density Areas 253 References 259 17 Privacy Protection with Short
Lived Unique Certificates 260 17.1 Short
Lived Unique Certificates 260 17.2 The Basic Short
Lived Certificate Scheme 261 17.3 The Problem of Large CRL 263 17.4 Anonymously Linked Certificates to Reduce CRL Size 264 17.5 Reduce CRL Search Time 268 17.6 Unlinked Short
Lived Certificates 269 17.7 Reduce the Volume of Certificate Request and Response Messages 270 17.8 Determine the Number of Certificates for Each Vehicle 270 References 273 18 Privacy Protection with Group Signatures 274 18.1 Group Signatures 274 18.2 Zero
Knowledge Proof of Knowledge 275 18.3 The ACJT Group Signature Scheme and its Extensions 277 18.4 The CG Group Signature Scheme with Revocation 286 18.5 The Short Group Signatures Scheme 288 18.6 Group Signature Schemes with Verifier
Local Revocation 292 References 293 19 Privacy Protection against Certificate Authorities 295 19.1 Introduction 295 19.2 Basic Idea 295 19.3 Baseline Split CA Architecture, Protocol, and Message Processing 297 19.4 Split CA Architecture for Shared Certifi cates 301 19.5 Split CA Architecture for Unlinked Short
Lived Certificates 302 19.6 Split CA Architecture for Anonymously Linked Short
Lived Certificates 308 References 314 20 Comparison of Privacy
Preserving Certificate Management Schemes 315 20.1 Introduction 315 20.2 Comparison of Main Characteristics 316 20.3 Misbehavior Detection 320 20.4 Abilities to Prevent Privacy Abuse by CA and MDS Operators 321 20.5 Summary 322 21 IEEE 1609.2 Security Services 323 21.1 Introduction 323 21.2 The IEEE 1609.2 Standard 323 21.3 Certificates and Certificate Authority Hierarchy 325 21.4 Formats for Public Key, Signature, Certificate, and CRL 327 21.5 Message Formats and Processing for Generating Encrypted Messages 333 21.6 Sending Messages 335 21.7 Request Certifi cates from the CA 336 21.8 Request and Processing CRL 343 21.9 What the Current IEEE 1609.2 Standard Does Not Cover 344 References 346 22 4G for Vehicle Safety Communications 347 22.1 Introduction 347 22.2 Long
Term Revolution (LTE) 347 22.3 LTE for Vehicle Safety Communications/ 353 References 358 Glossary 360 Index 367