Introducing C++ for Scientists, Engineers and Mathematicians - Capper, Derek
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  • Broschiertes Buch

C++ is among the most powerful and popular of programming languages for applications. This is an adoptable textbook for undergraduate students who need to use this language for applications that are - in the main - numerical. Most engineering, physics and mathematics degree courses include a computing element: this book should be used where C++ is the chosen language, already the majority of cases. The book is comprehensive and includes advanced features of the language, indicating where they are of special interest to the reader. No prior knowledge of C is assumed, and the book's bias towards numerical applications makes it unique in the field.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
C++ is among the most powerful and popular of programming languages for applications. This is an adoptable textbook for undergraduate students who need to use this language for applications that are - in the main - numerical. Most engineering, physics and mathematics degree courses include a computing element: this book should be used where C++ is the chosen language, already the majority of cases. The book is comprehensive and includes advanced features of the language, indicating where they are of special interest to the reader. No prior knowledge of C is assumed, and the book's bias towards numerical applications makes it unique in the field.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Springer / Springer, Berlin / Springer, London
  • 2nd ed.
  • Seitenzahl: 564
  • Erscheinungstermin: 6. September 2001
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 244mm x 170mm x 30mm
  • Gewicht: 1042g
  • ISBN-13: 9781852334888
  • ISBN-10: 1852334886
  • Artikelnr.: 05213934
Inhaltsangabe
1 Introduction.- 1.1 Getting Started.- 1.2 Solving a Quadratic Equation.- 1.3 An Object-oriented Example.- 1.4 Why Object-oriented?.- 1.5 Summary.- 1.6 Exercises.- 2 The Lexical Basis of C++.- 2.1 Characters and Tokens.- 2.2 Comments and White Space.- 2.3 Identifiers.- 2.4 Keywords.- 2.5 Constants.- 2.5.1 Integer Constants.- 2.5.2 Boolean Constants.- 2.5.3 Floating Point Constants.- 2.5.4 Character Constants.- 2.5.5 String Constants.- 2.6 Operators.- 2.7 Programming Style.- 2.8 Summary.- 2.9 Exercises.- 3 Fundamental Types and Basic Operators.- 3.1 Integral Data Types.- 3.1.1 Type int.- 3.1.2 Integer Multiplication.- 3.1.3 Integer Division.- 3.1.4 Integer Modulus or Remainder Operator.- 3.1.5 Increment and Decrement Operators.- 3.1.6 Associativity and Precedence of Integer Operators.- 3.1.7 Long Integers.- 3.1.8 Short Integers.- 3.1.9 Unsigned Integers.- 3.1.10 Booleans.- 3.1.11 Character Types.- 3.2 Floating Point Data Types.- 3.2.1 Type double.- 3.2.2 Type float.- 3.2.3 Type long double.- 3.3 Changing Types.- 3.3.1 Type Promotion and Conversion.- 3.3.2 Casts.- 3.4 Some Basic Operations.- 3.4.1 The sizeof Operator.- 3.4.2 Initialization.- 3.4.3 Assignment Operators.- 3.5 const.- 3.6 typedef.- 3.7 Summary.- 3.8 Exercises.- 4 Control Structure.- 4.1 Relational Operators.- 4.2 Logical Operators.- 4.3 Equal and Not Equal Operators.- 4.4 Blocks and Scope.- 4.5 Branch Statements.- 4.5.1 if Statement.- 4.5.2 if else Statement.- 4.5.3 switch Statement.- 4.6 Iteration Statements.- 4.6.1 while Statement.- 4.6.2 for Statement.- 4.6.3 do Statement.- 4.7 break and continue Statements.- 4.8 goto Statement.- 4.9 Comma Operator.- 4.10 Null Statement.- 4.11 Conditional Expression Operator.- 4.12 Order of Evaluation of Operands.- 4.13 The Preprocessor.- 4.13.1 include Directive.- 4.13.2 define Directive.- 4.13.3 Conditional Compilation.- 4.14 Enumerations.- 4.15 Summary.- 4.16 Exercises.- 5 Functions.- 5.1Introducing Functions.- 5.1.1 Defining and Calling Functions.- 5.1.2 Return Type.- 5.1.3 Function Declarations.- 5.1.4 Functions Cannot Declare Functions.- 5.1.5 Unused Arguments.- 5.1.6 Default Arguments.- 5.1.7 Ignoring the Return Value.- 5.2 Recursion.- 5.3 Inline Functions.- 5.4 More on Scope Rules.- 5.5 Storage Class static.- 5.6 Overloading Function Names.- 5.6.1 Ambiguity Resolution.- 5.7 Function main0.- 5.8 Standard Library.- 5.9 Using Functions.- 5.9.1 A Benchmark.- 5.9.2 Root Finding by Bisection.- 5.10 Summary.- 5.11 Exercises.- 6 Pointers and Arrays.- 6.1 Memory, Addressing and Pointers.- 6.1.1 Address-of Operator.- 6.1.2 Dereferencing or Indirection Operator.- 6.1.3 Pointers.- 6.1.4 Pointers Do Not Declare Memory.- 6.1.5 Null Pointer.- 6.2 One-dimensional Arrays.- 6.2.1 Pointers and One-dimensional Arrays.- 6.3 Type void.- 6.4 Pointer Conversions.- 6.5 Multi-dimensional Arrays.- 6.5.1 Pointers and Multi-dimensional Arrays.- 6.6 Initializing Arrays.- 6.7 Size of Arrays.- 6.8 Arrays of Pointers.- 6.9 Using Pointers and Arrays.- 6.9.1 Fitting Data to a Straight Line.- 6.9.2 Ragged Arrays.- 6.10 Summary.- 6.11 Exercises.- 7 Further Pointer Techniques.- 7.1 Strings.- 7.2 Pointers as Function Arguments.- 7.3 Passing Arrays as Function Arguments.- 7.3.1 One-dimensional Arrays.- 7.3.2 Multi-dimensional Arrays.- 7.4 Arguments to main().- 7.5 Pointers to Functions.- 7.6 Dynamic Memory Management.- 7.6.1 Allocating Memory.- 7.6.2 Deallocating Memory.- 7.7 Pass by Reference and Reference Variables.- 7.7.1 Reference Arguments.- 7.7.2 Reference Return Values.- 7.7.3 Reference Variables.- 7.8 Using Pointers, Arrays and Strings.- 7.8.1 Matrix Addition.- 7.8.2 An Alphabetic Sort.- 7.9 Summary.- 7.10 Exercises.- 8 Classes.- 8.1 Declaring Classes.- 8.2 Class Access Specifiers.- 8.3 Accessing Members.- 8.4 Assigning Objects.- 8.5 Functions and Classes.- 8.6 Data Hiding.- 8.7 Returning an Object.- 8.8 Reference Arguments.- 8.9 Pointers to Members.- 8.10 Pointer-to-Member Operators.- 8.11 Scope and Data Protection.- 8.12 Static Members.- 8.12.1 S
Rezensionen
From the reviews of the first edition: "The author of this book has done an outstanding job in introducing/explaining the aspects of C++...I highly recommend this book to students or professionals in engineering who are interested in migrating to C++ from Fortran." Rezensioner: A reader from Madison Heights, MI United States "This is not only the best introductory C++ book for scientists and engineers, but it is one of the best C++ books in general that I have seen." Rezensioner: James Bond from New Jersey, USA "I found this book to be an excellent introduction to C++ for use in scientific computing, and it remains the best Ie seen. With it I was able to use my existing programming experience in Fortran to write useful C++ very rapidly, although it should prove to be an excellent text for people with no pervious programming experience." Rezensioner: Dave Strickland from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.