A History of Women Philosophers - Waithe, M.E. (Hrsg.)
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aspirations, the rise of western monasticism was the most note worthy event of the early centuries. The importance of monasteries cannot be overstressed as sources of spirituality, learning and auto nomy in the intensely masculinized, militarized feudal period. Drawing their members from the highest levels of society, women's monasteries provided an outlet for the energy and ambition of strong-willed women, as well as positions of considerable authority. Even from periods relatively inhospitable to learning of all kinds, the memory has been preserved of a good number of women of education.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
aspirations, the rise of western monasticism was the most note worthy event of the early centuries. The importance of monasteries cannot be overstressed as sources of spirituality, learning and auto nomy in the intensely masculinized, militarized feudal period. Drawing their members from the highest levels of society, women's monasteries provided an outlet for the energy and ambition of strong-willed women, as well as positions of considerable authority. Even from periods relatively inhospitable to learning of all kinds, the memory has been preserved of a good number of women of education. Their often considerable achievements and influence, however, generally lie outside even an expanded definition of philo sophy. Among the most notable foremothers of this early period were several whose efforts signal the possibility of later philosophical work. Radegund, in the sixth century, established one of the first Frankish convents, thereby laying the foundations for women's spiritual and intellectual development. From these beginnings, women's monasteries increased rapidly in both number and in fluence both on the continent and in Anglo-Saxon England. Hilda (d. 680) is well known as the powerful abbsess of the double monastery of Whitby. She was eager for knowledge, and five Eng lish bishops were educated under her tutelage. She is also accounted the patron of Caedmon, the first Anglo-Saxon poet of religious verse. The Anglo-Saxon nun Lioba was versed in the liberal arts as well as Scripture and canon law.
  • Produktdetails
  • History of Women Philosophers Vol.2
  • Verlag: Springer Netherlands
  • Softcover reprint of the original 1st ed. 1989
  • Seitenzahl: 392
  • Erscheinungstermin: 31. Dezember 1989
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 240mm x 161mm x 21mm
  • Gewicht: 586g
  • ISBN-13: 9789024735723
  • ISBN-10: 9024735726
  • Artikelnr.: 21383032
Inhaltsangabe
1. Murasaki Shikibu.- 1. Introduction.- II. Background.- 1. Shint?.- 2. Buddhism.- 3. Philosophical Evolution.- 4. Women.- III. Biography.- IV. Writings.- 1. Ukifune.- 2. Existentialism.- V. Summary.- 2. Hildegard of Bingen.- I. Biography.- II. Works.- 1. Liber Scivias.- 2. Liber Vitae Meritorum.- 3. Liber Divinorum Operum.- 4. Writings on Nature.- 5. Other Works.- III. The Special Nuances of Hildegard's Image of God and of the Human Being.- 1. The Image of God.- 2. The Human Being as God's Image.- 3. Gender Symbolism.- 4. The Strength of Female Weakness.- 5. Woman and Wisdom.- 6. The Weakness of Male Strength.- IV. Conclusion.- 3. Heloise.- I. Biography.- II. Heloise the Scholar.- 1. Intellectual Background.- 2. Authenticity of Epistolae and Problemata.- III. Philosophy.- 1. Philosophy of Love.- 2. Material and Moral Responsibility.- 3. Views on Marriage.- IV. Summary.- 4. Herrad of Hohenbourg.- I. Introduction.- II. Hortus Deliciarum.- III. Philosophical Contributions.- 1. Cosmology.- 2. The Nature of Philosophy.- IV. Summary.- 5. Beatrice of Nazareth.- I. Biography.- 1. Early Mystical Experiences.- 2. Trinitarian Visions.- 3. Love of God and Love of Self in the Visions.- II. Works.- 1. The Seven Modes of Sacred Love.- 2. Lost Works.- III. Conclusion.- 6. Mechtild of Magdeburg.- I. Background.- II. Biography.- III. Works.- IV. Influences.- V. Metaphysics and Cosmology.- 1. Creation.- 2. Relation of Creation to God.- 3. The Image of God.- 4. Union.- VI. Anthropology and Epistemology.- 1. Senses and Knowledge.- 2. The Progression of Knowledge.- 3. Discernment and Recognition.- 4. The Interdependence of the Forms of Knowledge.- VII. Ethics.- VIII. Summary.- 7. Hadewych of Antwerp.- I. Background.- II. Biography.- III. Hadewych's Doctrine.- 1. Hadewych's Concept of God.- 2. Hadewych's Concept of Man.- IV. Works.- 1. Visions.- 2. Letters.- 3. Poems.- V. Conclusion.- 8. Birgitta of Sweden.- I. Biography.- 1. Asceticism.- 2. Political Activity.- 3. Education.- II. Birgitta's Writings.- 1. Relevationes.- 2. Sermo Angelicus.- 3. The Orationes.- III. Birgitta's Doctrine.- 1. Historical Background of Birgitta's Mariology.- 2. Birgitta's Doctrine on Mary.- 3. Concept of God.- 4. Birgitta's Doctrine on the Trinity.- 5. Concept of Human Nature.- 6. Political Thought.- IV. Summary.- 9. Julian of Norwich.- I. Biography.- II. The Nature of Knowledge.- 1. The Possibility of Knowing God.- 2. What Can be Known of God.- 3. Knowing Through Christ.- III. The Sources of Religious Knowledge.- 1. Visions and Certainty.- 2. The Church as a Source of Truth.- 3. Reason as a Source of Knowledge.- IV. The Limits of Knowledge.- 1. Incompleteness.- 2. Discouragement.- 3. Other Human Imperfections.- 4. "Not Showns".- V. Concluding Remarks.- 1. On the Value of Knowledge.- 2. On Julian's Influence.- 3. On a Further Research Agenda.- 4. Summary.- 10. Catherine of Siena.- I. Biography.- 11. Doctrine of Catherine of Siena.- 1. Love and Free Will.- 2. Freedom and Grace.- 3. Virtue and Salvation.- 4. The Importance of Intelligence and Reason.- 5. The Role of Divine Providence.- 6. The Perfection of the Soul.- 7. The Doctrine of Tears.- 8. The Christian Virtues.- 9. Poverty as a Spiritual Virtue.- 10. Suffering.- III. The Writings of Catherine of Siena.- 1. Letters.- 2. Il Dialogo.- 3. The Orazioni.- IV. Summary.- 11. Oliva Sabuco de Nantes Barrera.- I. Background.- 1. Galen.- 2. 16th Century Spanish Medicine.- 3. Juan Huarte de San Juan.- 4. Gomez Pereyra.- II. Biography.- III. Influence.- IV. Writings.- 1. Self-Knowledge.- 2. Cosmology, Metaphysics and Medicine.- 3. Imagination.- 4. Moral Psychology and Medicine.- 5. Philosophy of Medicine.- V. A Question of Authorship.- 12. Marie le Jars de Gournay.- I. Biography.- II. Literary Works.- III. Philosophical Works.- 1. Editions of Montaigne's Essays.- 2. Essays on Morality.- 3. Feminist Essays.- IV. Conclusion.- 13. Roswitha of Gandersheim, Christine Pisan, Margaret More Roper and Teresa of Avila.- I. Introductio

to Volume 1.- 1. Early Pythagoreans: Themistoclea, Theano, Arignote, Myia, and Damo.- I. Themistoclea, Arignote, and Damo.- II. Theano of Crotona.- III. Myia; Notes..- 2. Late Pythagoreans: Aesara of Lucania, Phintys of Sparta, and Perictione I.- I. Aesara of Lucania.- (1) Text of On Human Nature.- (2) The Nature of Law and Justice.- (3) Aesara on Moral Psychology.- (4) Aesara and Physical Medicine.- (5) A Note about Feminism.- (6) The Principled Structure of the Soul.- II. Phintys of Sparta.- (1) Text of On the Moderation of Women,Fragment I.- (2) Women and Virtue.- (3) Women and Justice in the Home.- (4) Phintys' On the Moderation of Women,Fragment II.- (5) Women and Religious Observances.- III. Perictione I.- (1) Translation of the Text.- (2) Relationships and Moral Obligation.- (3) Moral Pragmatism and Faithful Wives.- (4) Physical Beauty and the Moral Disorder of Women.- (5) Virtue, Power, Class and Oppression.- (6) Idealism versus Pragmatism; Comments by Vicki Lynn Harper,.- (7) Women and Piety.- (8) Translation of the Text; Notes..- 3. Late Pythagoreans: Theano II, and Perictione II.- I. Theano II.- (1) Theano II to Euboule.- (2) Theano II to Nikostrate.- (3) Theano to Kallisto; Commentary by Vicki Lynn Harper.- (4) Spurious Texts.- II. Perictione II.- (1) Text of Sophias.- (2) Wisdom and Morality; Notes..- 4. Authenticating the Fragments and Letters.- I. The Forgery Hypothesis.- (1) In Favor of the Forgery Hypothesis.- (2) Consequences of the Forgery Hypothesis.- II. The Pseudonymy Hypothesis.- (1) Consequences of the Pseudonymy Hypothesis: The "Female Authority" View.- (2) Consequences of the Pseudonymy Hypothesis: The Dissident Archytan View.- III. The Eponymy Hypothesis:.- (1) The Problem with Names.- (2) The Doric Language.- (3) Perictione l's Ionic Prose.- (4) Phintys' On the Moderation of Women.- (5) Aesara of Lucania's On Human Nature; Summary; Notes..- 5. Aspasia of Miletus.- I. Background.- II. The Menexenus and Pericles' Funeral Oration.- III. Two arguments about the Menexenus.- IV. Aspasia and Sophistic Rhetoric; Conclusions; Notes..- 6. Diotima of Mantinea.- I. Distinguishing Diotima from Plato and Socrates.- (1) Diotima's Concept of Beauty.- (2) Diotima's Concept of hmmortality.- (3) The Independence of Eros from Reason.- (4) Summary.- II. The Tradition of Diotima as a Fictitious Character.- (1) The "Plato is Feminizing Philosophy" Argument.- (2) The "Socratic Wit" Argument.- (3) The "Plato as Novelist" Argument.- (4) The "No Ancient Evidence" Argument.- (5) Objections to Arguments.- III. The historical Diotima.- (1) Evidence from Plato.- (2) The Archeological Evidence.- (3) The Written Testimony.- (4) Two Modern Opinions on the Historicity of Diotima.- IV. In Support of Thesis B.- (1) Immortality, Transmigration, and Personal Identity.- (2) Eros and Reason.- (3) The Idea of Beauty.- (4) Summary; Notes..- 7. Julia Domna.- I. Julia Domna's Biography.- II. "The Philosopher Julia".- (A) Who were the Members of Julia's Circle?.- (B) Who were the Sophists?.- (C) What Philosophy did Julia study?.- (D) What Philosophy did Julia herself seem to Favor?.- III. Conclusion; Notes..- 8. Makrina.- I. Biography.- II. Makrina and the Spiritual Tradition.- (1) The Unity and Immortality of the Soul.- (2) Ascetism.- (3) Gnosticism.- (4) Gnosticism, Christianity, and the Inferiority of Women.- III. Makrina and Woman's Soul.- (1) Makrina on the Soul and the ?á?? (Pathe).- (2) The Traditional Views of Women's Souls.- (3) Mary, the Mother of Christ in Patristic Literature.- (4) Woman and Anthropomorphic Thinking about God.- IV. Makrina on Creation, Reincarnation, and Resurrection.- (1) Makrina and the Plotinian Tradition.- (2) Makrina and the Porphyryian View.- (3) Makrina and the Tradition of Philo of Alexandria.- (4) Makrina and the Reincarnation Doctrines; Notes..- 9. Hypatia of Alexandria.- I. Biography.- II. Teaching.- III. Works.- (1) Commentary on Diophantus' Arithmeticorum.- (2) Commentary to Book III of Ptolemy's Sy

Introduction; M.E. Waithe. 1. Victoria, Lady Welby (1837
1912); W.A. Myers. 2. E.E. Constance Jones (1848
1922); M.E. Waithe, S. Cicero. 3. Charlotte Perkins Gilman (1860
1935; J.S. Murphy. 4. Lou Salomé (1861
1937); S.A. Wawrytko. 5. Mary Whiton Calkins (1863
1930); B.H. Zedler. 6. L. Susan Stebbing (1885
1943); M.G. Willow. 7. Edith Stein (1891
1942); M.C. Baseheart, S.C.N., L. McAlister with W. Stein. 8. Gerda Walther (1897
1977); L. McAlister. 9. Ayn Rand (1905
1982); J.A. Heil. 10. Cornelia Johanna de Vogel (1905
1986); Th.G. Sinnige. 11. Hannah Arendt (1906
1975); M.E. Waithe. 12. Simone de Beauvoir (1908
1986); J. Allen, J. Pilardi. 13. Simone Weil (1909
1943); K. Lindemann. 14. Twentieth Century Women Philosophers; M.E. Waithe. Appendix. Bibliography. Index.
Rezensionen
'It is an extremely important book which brings together in one text contributions of women philosophers in ancient western thought. It is well organized, very readable, and conveys a sense of excitement about the material covered.' -- P. Allen in RFR/DRF, vol. 18, no. 1