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An authoritative selection of letters by one of the great English letter-writers is here published for the first time in paperback. 'James T. Boulton, the chief editor of [the] definitive collection [of Lawrence's letters] has now condensed from it an admirable 500-pages worth of The Selected Letters of D. H. Lawrence. Section by section introductions, summary biographies of correspondents, and illuminating explanatory footnotes equip the reader to follow the contours of Lawrence's adult life as he progresses from teacher in Croydon to suspected German spy in Cornwall during the Great War, to…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
An authoritative selection of letters by one of the great English letter-writers is here published for the first time in paperback. 'James T. Boulton, the chief editor of [the] definitive collection [of Lawrence's letters] has now condensed from it an admirable 500-pages worth of The Selected Letters of D. H. Lawrence. Section by section introductions, summary biographies of correspondents, and illuminating explanatory footnotes equip the reader to follow the contours of Lawrence's adult life as he progresses from teacher in Croydon to suspected German spy in Cornwall during the Great War, to wanderer in self-imposed exile in Australia, the US and Mexico, and finally consumptive, dying in Provence.' Jonathan Bate, Sunday Telegraph 'Five thousand letters cram the eight-volume Cambridge edition of Lawrence's correspondence. So this selection, representing the full range of Lawrence's influential acquaintance, is welcome. Angry, combative, scurrilous, the letters are also sometimes uniquely lyrical.' Independent on Sunday

Table of contents:
Introduction; Biographical list of correspondents; Letters: 1. The formative years, 1885-1913; 2. The Rainbow and Women in Love, 1913-1916; 3. Cornwall and Italy, 1916-1921; 4. Eastwards to the new world, 1921-1924; 5. New Mexico, Mexico and Italy, 1924-1927; 6. Europe and Lady Chatterley's Lover, 1927-1928; 7. Decline and death, 1928-1930.

'The Selected Letters succeeds admirably in representing Lawrence's quirky brilliance, his always surprising common sense, and above all else the sheer beauty of his writing.' English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920

'This invigorating collection ... is ... a monument to scholarship for which we should be grateful.' D. H. Lawrence Review
Autorenporträt
David Herbert Richards "D. H." Lawrence (11 September 1885 - 2 March 1930) was an English novelist, poet, playwright, essayist, literary critic and painter. His collected works represent, among other things, an extended reflection upon the dehumanising effects of modernity and industrialisation. Some of the issues Lawrence explores are emotional health, vitality, spontaneity and instinct. Lawrence's opinions earned him many enemies and he endured official persecution, censorship, and misrepresentation of his creative work throughout the second half of his life, much of which he spent in a voluntary exile which he called his "savage pilgrimage." At the time of his death, his public reputation was that of a pornographer who had wasted his considerable talents. E. M. Forster, in an obituary notice, challenged this widely held view, describing him as, "The greatest imaginative novelist of our generation." Lawrence is perhaps best known for his novels Sons and Lovers, The Rainbow, Women in Love and Lady Chatterley's Lover. Within these Lawrence explores the possibilities for life within an industrial setting. In particular Lawrence is concerned with the nature of relationships that can be had within such a setting. Though often classed as a realist, Lawrence in fact uses his characters to give form to his personal philosophy. His depiction of sexual activity, though seen as shocking when he first published in the early 20th century, has its roots in this highly personal way of thinking and being. It is worth noting that Lawrence was very interested in the sense of touch and that his focus on physical intimacy has its roots in a desire to restore an emphasis on the body, and re-balance it with what he perceived to be Western civilisation's over-emphasis on the mind.