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This book comes against the unchallenged methods in medicine, such as "evidence-based medicine," which claim to be, but often are not, scientific. It completes medical care by adding the comprehensive humanistic perspectives and philosophy of medicine. No specific or absolute recommendations are given regarding medical treatment, moral approaches, or legal advice. Given rather is discussion about each issue involved and the strongest arguments indicated. Each argument is subject to further critical analysis. This is the same position as with any philosophical, medical or scientific view. The…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This book comes against the unchallenged methods in medicine, such as "evidence-based medicine," which claim to be, but often are not, scientific. It completes medical care by adding the comprehensive humanistic perspectives and philosophy of medicine. No specific or absolute recommendations are given regarding medical treatment, moral approaches, or legal advice. Given rather is discussion about each issue involved and the strongest arguments indicated. Each argument is subject to further critical analysis. This is the same position as with any philosophical, medical or scientific view. The argument that decision-making in medicine is inadequate unless grounded on a philosophy of medicine is not meant to include all of philosophy and every philosopher. On the contrary, it includes only sound, practical and humanistic philosophy and philosophers who are creative and critical thinkers and who have concerned themselves with the topics relevant to medicine. These would be those philosophers who engage in practical philosophy, such as the pragmatists, humanists, naturalists, and ordinary-language philosophers. A new definition of our own philosophy of life emerges and it is necessary to have one. Good lifestyle no longer means just abstaining from cigarettes, alcohol and getting exercise. It also means living a holistic life, which includes all of one's thinking, personality and actions. This book also includes new ways of thinking. In this regard the "Metaphorical Method" is explained, used, and exemplified in depth, for example in the chapters on care, egoism and altruism, letting die, etc.
  • Produktdetails
  • International Library of Ethics, Law, and the New Medicine Vol.47
  • Verlag: Springer Netherlands
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: 12760848
  • Erscheinungstermin: Mai 2011
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 244mm x 164mm x 41mm
  • Gewicht: 990g
  • ISBN-13: 9789048188666
  • ISBN-10: 9048188660
  • Artikelnr.: 28110284
Autorenporträt
Warren Shibles was a Senior philosophy professor at the University of Wisconsin at Whitewater, Wisconsin and also taught courses at Tübingen, Germany. He has published 27 books, and over 180 professional journal articles.He also was a researcher in phonetics. He died in July 2007. Barbara Maier is a Senior physician, gynaecologist and obstetrician at the Women`s Hospital in Salzburg and head of the Department of Gynaecological Endocrinology and Assisted Reproduction at the University Clinic of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Salzburg, Austria. She has been teaching ethics in medicine at the Institute for Ethics and Law at the University of Vienna since 1993. She has a Ph.D. in Philosophy, and M.D from the University of Vienna.
Inhaltsangabe
Rationale of the book About the Authors 1. Metaphor in Medicine. The Metaphorical Method 1.1 Introduction 1.2 Types of metaphor 1.2.1 Substitution 1.2.2 Juxtaposition 1.2.3 Analogy, Simile, or Comparison 1.2.4 Symbolism 1.2.5 Metonymy 1.2.6 Synecdoche 1.2.7 Synesthesia 1.2.8 Reversal 1.2.9 Personification 1.2.10 Oxymora or combination of opposites 1.2.11 Deviation 1.2.12 Metaphor-to-myth fallacy 1.3 Metaphorical methods should be considered for analysis of and writing research papers 1.4. Clarification of medical language 1.5 Case example: A healthcare worker (H) - patient (P) metaphoric: H/P modeling in medicine 1.6 H/P models 2. Definition 2.1 Where does it come from that we think we need to define? 2.2 Distinction between types of definition 3. Decision Making: fallacies and other mistakes 3.1 Conditions of decision-making 3.2 Frequent causes of irrational medical thinking and decision-making 3.3 Five levels of decision-making in medicine 3.4 Fallacies in decision-making 3.5 Mistakes 3.5.1. What are mistakes? 3.5.2. What are indications of errors? 3.5.3. Indications that mistakes are often preventable ones 3.5.4. What are the reasons for the mistakes? 3.5.4.1 Questionable medical treatments 3.5.4.2 Error is necessary 3.5.4.3 Uncritical thinking (speaking) 3.5.4.4 Medical knowledge is lacking 3.5.4.5. System as a cause of error 3.5.4.6 Some mistakes are not mistakes 3.5.4.7 Guidelines are not followed 3.5.4.8 Self-caused mistakes 3.5.4.9. Patient errors 3.5.4.10 Lack of sufficient attention 3.5.4.11 Misdiagnosis 3.5.4.12 Overwork 3.5.4.13 Limitations of knowledge in medicine 3.5.4.14 Unfair medical threats of malpractice suits threaten physicians 3.5.4.15 Unfair blame 3.5.4.16 Protocols of good management are violated 3.5.4.17 Unfairness of the law 3.5.4.18 Negative emotions 3.5.5 Case example: Misleading diagnosis 3.5.6 Personal experiences: mistakes 4. Analysis of Causation in Medicine 4.1 Decision-making and cause 4.2 Synonyms of cause 4.3 Antonyms for cause 4.4 Metaphorical models for cause 4.5 Substitutions for cause 4.6 Temporal factors in causality 4.7 Types of causality 4.8. Summary 5. Ethics and Non-Ethics 5.1 Introduction 5.2 A naturalistic theory of ethics 5.3 What is ethics in actual usage? 5.4 Ethics and morals: an unethical society 5.5 Value contradictions 5.6 Examples of contradictions 5.7 On being non-ethical and anti-inquiry 5.8 Brief conclusion 5.9 An Ethics Text for British Medical Schools 5.10 Case example: medicine and dysfunctional culture 5.11 Case example: military medical service as contradictory to medical practice 5.12. Insensitivity to killing: the failure to be embarrassed. 5.13 Case example: on sensitivity 5.14 Case example: Tsunami disaster and cultural irresponsibility 5.15 Case example: culture and family as anti-medicine: female circumcision 6. Medicotheology and Biotheology 6.1 Introduction. How many people have religious beliefs? 6.2 The influence of religion on bioethics and medicine 6.3 Church opposition to medicine 6.4 Should medicine be based on supernaturalism? 6.5 Science and metaphysical causes? 6.6 Case example: religion and autonomy 6.7 Religion versus medicine: a common ground? 6.8 Religion as ethics 6.9 Ethics Committees 6.10 Humanism versus religion 6.11 Absolute religious ethics versus consequentialism 6.12 Case example: deprogramming religion in medicine 6.13 Case example: a real woman 6.14 The person as a soul 6.15 Sanctity-of-life (human) 6.16 General observations regarding the Value of human life 6.17 Contradictions regarding the Sanctity-of-Life doctrine 6.18 Selected arguments from the philosophy of religion 6.19 Prayer as medical treatment 7. Emotion in Medicine 7.1 Introduction 7.2 Case example: non-mental associations provide complexity to cognitions 7.3 Emotion is not an internal state 7.4 Emotions can be changed 7.5 The happy Stoics: passionate ratio
Rezensionen
From the reviews:

“The Philosophy and Practice of Medicine and Bioethics, it provides an overview of the crucial issues being faced in medical practice, replete with interesting case studies and patient-care narratives … . The authors repeatedly encourage good, open communication between patients and healthcare workers as well as between healthcare professionals and management staff. They also advocate constructive dialogue and human relationships based on trust, which are surely relevant aspects of what a philosophy of medicine must promote.” (Francesca Marin, Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics, Vol. 34, 2013)

“This book advocates a philosophy of medicine founded on humanism and naturalism. … a philosophical work providing an honest, detailed, analytical inquiry of prevailing concepts and methods used in medicine. … The book, a mixture of philosophical argument, opinions, case studies, and patient-care narratives from the authors’ experience, is best appreciated … . I found this book to be an informative read … . most understood and best appreciated by academics in moral philosophy and ethics … . the book is surely worth the effort.” (Andrew R. Barnosky, Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 306 (8), August, 2011)

“The purpose is to present a ‘naturalistic, practical, pragmatic, consequentialistic, and humanistic theory of ethics,’ to apply this to the philosophy of medicine, and to examine existing bioethical arguments in light of this theory. A systematic approach to this topic is quite welcome. … the book will be helpful to practitioners, and … healthcare workers (and everyone else) would benefit greatly from paying greater attention to philosophical ethics. … Readers sympathetic to naturalistic and humanistic philosophies are the most likely to find this work helpful.” (D. Robert MacDougall, Doody’s Review Service, February, 2011)

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