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Describes how to conduct kinetic experiments with heterogeneous catalysts, analyze and model the results, and characterize the catalysts Detailed analysis of mass transfer in liquid phase reactions involving porous catalysts. Important to the fine chemicals and pharmaceutical industries so it has appeal to many researchers in both industry and academia (chemical engineering and chemistry departments …mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Describes how to conduct kinetic experiments with heterogeneous catalysts, analyze and model the results, and characterize the catalysts
Detailed analysis of mass transfer in liquid phase reactions involving porous catalysts.
Important to the fine chemicals and pharmaceutical industries so it has appeal to many researchers in both industry and academia (chemical engineering and chemistry departments
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Springer, Berlin
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: 11383857
  • 2005
  • Seitenzahl: 264
  • Erscheinungstermin: August 2011
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 241mm x 160mm x 19mm
  • Gewicht: 494g
  • ISBN-13: 9780387246499
  • ISBN-10: 0387246495
  • Artikelnr.: 14719933
Autorenporträt
After doing undergraduate work at Michigan State University, and graduate work at Stanford, Dr. Vannice did a post doc at Sun Oil Company before joining Exxon. In 1976 he moved to Pennsylvania State University, where he remains. After holding the M.R. Fenske Professor of Chemical Engineering, he became the W.H. Joyce Chair in Chemical Engineering, which position he holds now. Dr. Vannice belongs to ACS, AIChE, has served first as Secretary and then as Director of the New York Catalysis Society, and has served on the Board of Directors of, as the Vice-President of, and then as President of the North American Catalysis Society. He spent seven years as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Catalysis, and continues on its Editorial Board. Dr. Vannice has received numerous honors from his colleagues, including the Emmett Award (North American Catalysis Society), the Humboldt Senior Research Award, and the Senior Fulbright Award. Dr. Vannice has over 250 publications and 9 patents.
Inhaltsangabe
Foreword
Preface
List of Symbols
1. Regular Symbols
2. Greek Symbols
3. Subscripts 1: Introduction 2: Definitions and Concepts
2.1 Stoichiometric Coefficients
2.2 Extent of Reaction
2.3 Rate of Reaction
2.4 Turnover Frequency or Specific Activity
2.5 Selectivity
2.6 Structure-Sensitive and Structure4nsensitive Reactions
2.7 Elementary Step and Rate Determining Step (RDS)
2.8 Reaction Pathway or Catalytic Cycle
2.9 Most Abundant Reaction Intermediate (MARI)
2.10 Chain Reactions
2.11 Reaction Rates in Reactors
2.12 Metal Dispersion (Fraction Exposed)
2.13 Meta1Support Interactions (MSI)
References 3: Catalyst Characterization
3.1 Total (BET) Surface Area
3.2 Pore Volume and Pore Size Distribution
3.2.1 Hg Porosimetry Method
3.2.2 N2 Desorption Method
3.2.3 Overall Pore Size Distribution
3.3 Metal Surface Area, Crystallite Size, and Dispersion
3.3.1 Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM)
3.3.2 X-Ray Techniques
3.3.2.1 Line Broadening of X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) Peaks
3.3.2.2 ExtendedX-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS)
3.3.3 Magnetic Measurements
3.3.4 Chemisorption Methods
3.3.4.1 H2 Chemisorption
3.3.4.2 CO Chemisorption
3.3.4.3 02 Chemisorption
3.3.4.4 H2-02 Titration Techniques
3 3.5 Relationships Between Metal Dispersion, Surface Area, and Crystallite Size
References
Problems 4: Acquisition and Evaluation of Reaction Rate Data
4.1 Types of Reactors
4.1.1 Batch Reactor
4.1.2 Semi-Batch Reactor
4.1.3 Plug-Flow Reactor (PFR)
4.1.4 Continuous Flow Stirred-Tank Reactor (CSTR)
4.2 Heat and Mass Transfer Effects
4.2.1 Interphase (External) Gradients (Damköhler Number)
4.2.1.1 Isothermal Conditions
4.2.1.2 Nonisothermal Conditions
4.2.2 Intraphase (Internal) Gradients (Thiele Modulus)
4.2.1.1 Isothermal Conditions
4.2.2.2Nonisothermal Conditions
4.2.2.3 Determining an Intraphase (Internal) Effectiveness Factor from a Thiele Modulus
4.2.3 Intraphase Gradients (Weisz-Prater Criterion)
4.2.3.1 Gas-Phase or Vapor-Phase Reactions
4.2.3.2 Liquid-Phase Reactions
4.2.4 Other Criteria to Verify the Absence of Mass and Heat Transfer Limitations (The Madon-Boudart Method)
4.2.5 Summary of Tests for Mass and Heat Transfer Effects
References
Problems 5: Adsorption and Desorption Processes
5.1 Adsorption Rate
5.2 Desorption Rate
5.3 Adsorption Equilibrium on Uniform (Ideal) Surfaces-Langmuir Isotherms
5.3.1 Single-Site (Nondissociative) Adsorption
5.3.2 Dual-Site (Dissociative) Adsorption
5.3.3 Derivation of the Langmuir Isotherm by Other Approaches
5.3.4 Competitive Adsorption
5.4 Adsorption Equilibrium on Nonuniform (Nonideal) Surfaces
5.4.1 The Freundlich Isotherm
5.4.2 The Temkin Isotherm
5.5 Activated Adsorption
References
Problems 6: Kinetic Data Analysis and Evaluation of Model Parameters for Uniform (Ideal) Surfaces
6.1 Transition-State Theory (TST) or Absolute Rate Theory
6.2 The Steady-State Approximation (SSA)
6.3 Heats of Adsorption and Activation Barriers on Metal Surfaces: BOC-MP/UBI-QEP Method
6.3.1 Basic BOC-MP/UBI-QEP Assumptions      04
.3.2 Heats of Atomic Chemisorption
6.3.3 Heats of Molecular Chemisorption
6.3.4 Activation Barriers for Dissociation and Recombination on Metal Surfaces
6.4 Use of a Rate Determining Step (RDS) and/or a Most Abundant Reaction Intermediate (MARl)
6.5 Evaluation of Parameter Consistency in Rate Expressions for Ideal Surfaces
References
Problems 7: Modeling Reactions on Uniform (Ideal) Surfaces
7.1 Reaction Models with a RDS Unimolecular Surface Reactions
7.2 Reaction Models with a RDS Bimolecular Surface Reactions
7.3 Reaction Models with a RDS Reactions between an Adsorbed Species and a Gas