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Coastal dunes occur in almost every latitude - from tropical to polar - and have been substantially altered by human activities. Many are already severely and irreversibly degraded. Although these ecosystems have been studied for a long time (as early as 1835), there has been a strong emphasis on the mid-latitude dune systems and a lack of attention given to the tropics where, unfortunately, much of the modern exploitation and coastal development for tourism is occurring.
This book brings together coastal dune specialists from tropical and temperate latitudes, which together cover a wide
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Produktbeschreibung
Coastal dunes occur in almost every latitude - from tropical to polar - and have been substantially altered by human activities. Many are already severely and irreversibly degraded. Although these ecosystems have been studied for a long time (as early as 1835), there has been a strong emphasis on the mid-latitude dune systems and a lack of attention given to the tropics where, unfortunately, much of the modern exploitation and coastal development for tourism is occurring.

This book brings together coastal dune specialists from tropical and temperate latitudes, which together cover a wide set of topics, including: geomorphology, community dynamics, ecophysiology, biotic interactions and environmental problems and conservation. A major product of this book is a set of recommendations for future research, identifying relevant topics where detailed knowledge is still lacking. It also identifies management tools that will promote and maintain the rich diversity of the dune environments in the context of continuing coastal development.
Autorenporträt
M. Luisa Martínez, Institute of Ecology, Xalapa, Mexico / Norbert P. Psuty, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, USA

Inhaltsangabe
to stress and disturbance. By Ripley BS and Pammenter NW10. Plant functional types in coastal dune habitats. By García Novo F, Díaz Barradas MC, Zunzunegui M, García Mora R and Gallego Fernández JB IV Biotic Interactions11. Arbuscular mycorrhizas in coastal sand dunes. By Koske RE, Gemma JN, Corkidi L, Sigüenza C and Rincón E12. The role of algal mats on community succession in dunes and dune slacks. By Vázquez G13. Plant-plant interactions in coastal sand dunes. By Martínez ML and García-Franco JG14. Ant-Plant interactions: their seasonal variation and effects on plant fitness. By Rico-Gray V, Oliveira PS, Parra-Tabla V, Cuautle M and Díaz-Castelazo CV Environmental Problems and Conservation15. Environmental problems and restoration measures in coastal sand dunes inthe Netherlands. By Kooijman AM16. The costs of our coasts: examples of dynamic dune management from western Europe. By van der Meulen F, Bakker TWM and Houston JA17. Animal life in sand dunes: from exploitation and prosecution to protection and monitoring. By Baeyens G and Martínez ML18. Coastal vegetation as indicators for conservation. By Espejel I, Ahumada B, Cruz Y and Heredia A19. A case study of conservation and management of tropical sand dune systems: La Mancha-El Llano. By Moreno-Casasola P20. European coastal dunes: ecological values, threats, opportunities and policy development. By Heslenfeld P, Jungerius PD and Klijn JA VI The Coastal Dune Paradox: Conservation vs. Exploitation?21. The fragility and conservation of the world´s coastal dunes: geomorphological, ecological and socioeconomic perspectives. By Martínez ML, Maun MA and Psuty NP
Rezensionen
From the reviews:

"This book had its origin in a session at the International Botanical Congress in Missouri (1999), when it was agreed to produce a peer-reviewed book on coastal sand dunes ... . There is a great deal of good information in this book, with each of the chapters having an extensive list of references. Gaps in knowledge are identified and recommendations made for future research. ... The book has good taxonomic and general indexes ... . Diagrams, graphs and tables are well reproduced ... ." (Janet Sprent, Bulletin of the British Ecological Society, 2005)