The Food-Energy-Water Nexus (eBook, PDF)
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This will be the first textbook on the integration of food, energy and water systems (FEWS). In recent years, the world has seen a dramatic rise in interdisciplinary energy and environmental courses and degrees at the undergraduate and graduate levels. In the US for instance, the number and variety of such programs has increased significantly over the past decade, Simultaneously, national and international initiatives that integrate food, energy and water systems have been launched.
This textbook provides a substantive introduction to the food-energy-water nexus suitable for use in higher
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Produktbeschreibung
This will be the first textbook on the integration of food, energy and water systems (FEWS). In recent years, the world has seen a dramatic rise in interdisciplinary energy and environmental courses and degrees at the undergraduate and graduate levels. In the US for instance, the number and variety of such programs has increased significantly over the past decade, Simultaneously, national and international initiatives that integrate food, energy and water systems have been launched.

This textbook provides a substantive introduction to the food-energy-water nexus suitable for use in higher level undergraduate and graduate level courses and for scholars moving into the field of nexus studies without a strong background in all three areas and the many aspects of nexus studies.


Dieser Download kann aus rechtlichen Gründen nur mit Rechnungsadresse in A, B, BG, CY, CZ, D, DK, EW, E, FIN, F, GR, HR, H, IRL, I, LT, L, LR, M, NL, PL, P, R, S, SLO, SK ausgeliefert werden.

  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: Springer-Verlag GmbH
  • Seitenzahl: 688
  • Erscheinungstermin: 6. April 2020
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9783030299149
  • Artikelnr.: 59149437
Autorenporträt
Peter Saundry is an Adjunct Professor of Energy at Johns Hopkins University and Senior Fellow at the National Council for Science and Environment where he was Executive Director (1993-2016). He is also a consultant on science and policy integration, energy and climate policy development, and federal funding for energy and climate research and development. His PhD is in Physics from the University of Southern California, and was an American Physical Society Congressional Science Fellow for the Appropriations Committee of the U.S. Senate.
Ben Ruddell is currently a Professor in and the Director of the School of Informatics, Computing, and Cyber Systems at Northern Arizona University, the President of Ruddell Environmental consulting, Chief Science Officer for Criticality Sciences Inc., and the Director of the FEWSION project. His PhD is in Civil and Environmental Engineering from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a registered Professional Engineer in Arizona (Water Resources practice). His professional goals are the advancement of the science and management of complex systems, and excellence in education in a university setting.
Inhaltsangabe
Part I Framing the Nexus

Chapter 1. Introduction

1.1 Structure of the Book

1.2 Why food, energy, and water?

1.3 Systems science

1.4 Integrating systems

1.5 Scientific challenges at the nexus

1.6 Human challenges at the nexus

Chapter 2. Demographics, Supply, Demand and Sustainable Development Goals

1.1 Demographics and geography

1.2 Evolving demands for food, energy, and water

1.3 Geographical variations and their consequences

1.4 Sustainable Development Goals

1.5 The nexus and implementation of the SDGs

Chapter 3. Ecosystems at the Nexus

3.1 Introduction to ecosystem services

3.2 Valuing ecosystems and ecosystem services

3.3 Relationship to sustainable development goals (SDGs)

3.4 Case study: Erosion and agriculture

Chapter 4. Infrastructure

4.1. Introduction to Infrastructure Integration

4.2. Hard and Soft Infrastructures

4.3. Infrastructure Networks

4.4. Cascading Failures

4.5. Case Studies: Energy, Water, Food

Chapter 5. Climate

5.1. Climate change basics

5.2. Climate change stress at the nexus: Slow systemic changes, extreme events, cascading effects, climate risks at different scales

5.3. Climate modelling and the nexus

5.4. Climate policies vs. nexus policies

5.5. Climate adaptation strategies

Chapter 6. Economics

6.1. Introduction

6.2. Economic aspects of the nexus (demand & supply; rebound effect; non-market valuation)

6.3. Transferring results

6.4. Case studies: water

6.5. Economic influences (general influences; induced innovation, limits; incentives; welfare)

6.6. Broader items (externalities; income distribution and income inequality; incorporating dynamic concerns; uncertainty and risk aversion; private-public issues; cost-benefit)

6.7. Conclusions

Part II Scientific Tools at the Nexus

Chapter 7. Questions and Scales

7.1. Framing the nexus

7.2. Scale issues

7.3. Time issues

7.4. Addressing Risk

7.5. Addressing human behavior

7.6. Scientific tools at nexus

7.7. Challenges and Applications

Chapter 8. Metrics

8.1. Introduction

8.2. Metric characteristics

8.3. Metrics and models

8.4. Data constraints

8.5. Computing constraints

8.6. Methodological frameworks (life cycle assessment; metric scale; metric taxonomy)

8.7. Case studies: Two Texas river basins; use of metrics to improve drought management

Chapter 9. Data

9.1. Introduction

9.2. Data Structure

9.3. Data quality

9.4. Metadata

9.5. Spatial resolution

9.6. Temporal resolution

9.7. Process resolution

Chapter 10. Modeling

10.1. Introduction to modeling

10.2. Modeling needs at the nexus

10.3. Challenges for FEWS modeling

10.4. Some key questions (food-energy; energy-water; water-food; FEWS-climate)

10.5. Moving forward

Chapter 11. Computing

11.1. Introduction to Computer Science

11.2. Computer Science Background

11.3. Computer science as a tool

11.4. Challenges and tools

11.5. Case Studies: Precision agriculture; geodesign on large farms-landscape level; GEOGLAM (Global Agricultural Monitoring)

Chapter 12. Questions and Scales revisited

12.1. Pulling the lessons from chapters 7-11

Part III: Human dimensions

Chapter 13. Human Behavior and Adaptation

13.1. Introduction

13.2. Social science perspectives of coupled human-natural systems (decision science; economics; sociology; human motivations, perceptions and beliefs; individuals and communities)

13.3. Data and methods used to model decisions at individual and community scales.

13.4. Case study 1: Migration

13.5. Modeling challenges

Chapter 14. Conflict, Mediation, and Dispute Resolution

14.1. Introduction: Existing conflicts over food, energy and water systems

14.2. Conflicts at Different Scales (individual, community, regional, national, international)

14.3. Opportunities to address and manage conflicts (Alternative Dispute Resolution methods)

14.4. Ways of bring the science into the decision-making process

14.5. Case studies (individual, community, regional, national, international)

14.6. Conflict resolution toolkit

14.7. Conclusion

Chapter 15. Global and International Policy and Law

15.1. Introduction

15.2. International water law

15.3. International energy law

15.4. International food law

15.5. Conclusions

Chapter 16. U.S. Policy and Law

16.1. Introduction (framing international and U.S. law at the nexus; federalism)

16.2. The U.S. Regulatory Framework (water, energy, food)

16.3. Innovation from below (state regulations)

16.4. Pathways for increased integration

16.5. Conclusion

Part IV: Two Approaches to the Nexus

Chapter 17. Cities

17.1. Introduction

17.2. Drivers: The Socio-Political Context

17.3. Supply Chain: The Biophysical context

17.4. City Types and Case Studies (Portland, Detroit, Curitiba, Tianjin)

Chapter 18. Watersheds

18.1. Introduction

18.2. The Great Lakes Region of North America

18.3. The Amazon river basin of South America

18.4. Lake Victoria Basin of East Africa

18.5. Conclusions

Part V: The Future of the Nexus Field

Chapter 19: A Community of Science and Practice

19.1. Introduction

19.2. An integrated approach to resource management

19.3. A Community of Science and Practice

19.4. Conclusion

Chapter 20: Opportunities at the Nexus

20.1. Looking forward

20.2. Opportunities in science

20.3. Opportunities in practice

20.4. Sustainable societies

20.5. Conclusions