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1857. Illustrated by over 360 wood engravings, from original drawings, by Isaac Sprague. To which is added a copious glossary, or dictionary of botanical terms. The author writes that: This book is intended for the use of beginners, and for classes in the common and higher schools, -in which the elements of Botany, one of the most generally interesting of the Natural Sciences, surely ought to be taught, and to be taught correctly, as far as the instruction proceeds. While these Lessons are made as plain and simple as they well can be all the subjects treated have been carried far enough to…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
1857. Illustrated by over 360 wood engravings, from original drawings, by Isaac Sprague. To which is added a copious glossary, or dictionary of botanical terms. The author writes that: This book is intended for the use of beginners, and for classes in the common and higher schools, -in which the elements of Botany, one of the most generally interesting of the Natural Sciences, surely ought to be taught, and to be taught correctly, as far as the instruction proceeds. While these Lessons are made as plain and simple as they well can be all the subjects treated have been carried far enough to make the book a genuine Grammar of Botany and Vegetable Physiology, and a sufficient introduction to those works in which the plants of a country-especially our own-are described.
Autorenporträt
Asa Gray, who lived from November 18, 1810, to January 30, 1888, is regarded as the most significant American botanist of the 1800s. His Darwiniana was seen as a seminal account of how science and faith did not always have to conflict. Gray insisted that all members of a species have to be genetically related. Additionally, he was adamantly against the concepts of special creation, which prevents evolution, and hybridization within a single generation. Despite the fact that Gray's theistic evolution was directed by a Creator, he was a fervent Darwinist. Throughout his many years as a botany professor at Harvard University, Gray maintained regular correspondence and visits with many of the top natural scientists of the day, including Charles Darwin, who thought highly of him. In addition to visits to the southern and western regions of the United States, Gray made multiple travels to Europe in order to work with prominent European scientists of the day. He also established a wide network of collectors of specimens. Being a prolific writer, he played a significant role in bringing North American plant taxonomy together.