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Codebreaker in the Far East is the first book to describe how Bletchley Park and its Indian and Far Eastern outposts broke a series of Japanese codes and cipher systems of dazzling variety and complexity. Their achievements made a major contribution to the Allied victory in Burma, and probably helped to shorten and win the war, perhaps by two or three years. Alan Stripp gives his first-hand account of the excitement of reading the enemy's mind, of working against the clock, hampered by one of the world's most daunting languages and the knowledge that they were facing an unyielding and resourceful enemy who had never known defeat.…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Codebreaker in the Far East is the first book to describe how Bletchley Park and its Indian and Far Eastern outposts broke a series of Japanese codes and cipher systems of dazzling variety and complexity. Their achievements made a major contribution to the Allied victory in Burma, and probably helped to shorten and win the war, perhaps by two or three years. Alan Stripp gives his first-hand account of the excitement of reading the enemy's mind, of working against the clock, hampered by one of the world's most daunting languages and the knowledge that they were facing an unyielding and resourceful enemy who had never known defeat.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: OXFORD UNIV PR
  • Seitenzahl: 224
  • Erscheinungstermin: Oktober 2002
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 202mm x 163mm x 15mm
  • Gewicht: 181g
  • ISBN-13: 9780192803863
  • ISBN-10: 0192803867
  • Artikelnr.: 21547845
Autorenporträt
Alan Stripp in 1943 was a first-year Cambridge classics scholar with an aptitude for musical composition, chess, and crossword puzzles. These attributes led to his selection for training in breaking Japanese codes, which he did at Bletchley Park and in Delhi until the end of the war, when he switched to Persian and Afghan codes. Returning to Cambridge, he changed course to read Japanese and Chinese. His later career embraced the British Council in Portugal and Indonesia, and both lecturing and administration at Cambridge. Since retiring in 1988 he has directed Cambridge University summer schools on British secret intelligence.