Human Missions to Mars - Rapp, Donald
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This book presents a highly readable yet realistic view of the possibilities for human missions to Mars. It provides for the first time a 'level-headed' assessment of plans for human exploration of Mars to counteract the tendency of space agencies to take an over-optimistic approach to such interplanetary missions. The author presents a detailed analysis of why, in his opinion, the current NASA approach will fail to send humans to Mars before 2080. …mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This book presents a highly readable yet realistic view of the possibilities for human missions to Mars. It provides for the first time a 'level-headed' assessment of plans for human exploration of Mars to counteract the tendency of space agencies to take an over-optimistic approach to such interplanetary missions. The author presents a detailed analysis of why, in his opinion, the current NASA approach will fail to send humans to Mars before 2080.
  • Produktdetails
  • Astronautical Engineering
  • Verlag: Springer, Berlin
  • Softcover reprint of hardcover 1st ed. 2008
  • Seitenzahl: 560
  • Erscheinungstermin: 19. November 2010
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 244mm x 170mm x 29mm
  • Gewicht: 954g
  • ISBN-13: 9783642092015
  • ISBN-10: 3642092012
  • Artikelnr.: 32026200
Inhaltsangabe
Why explore Mars?.- Planning space campaigns and missions.- Getting there and back.- Critical Mars mission elements.- In situ utilization of indigenous resources.- Mars mission analysis.- How NASA is dealing with return to the Moon.- Why the NASA approach will likely fail to send humans to Mars prior to c. 2080.

Rezensionen
Aus den Rezensionen: "... Donald Rapp ... hat die Anforderungen an eine bemannte Mars-Mission aus unabhängiger Warte ins Visier genommen und realistisch - für manche Enthusiasten vielleicht sogar ernüchternd - analysiert. ... Das mit zahlreichen Tabellen, Diagrammen und Illustrationen ausgestattete ... Werk ist sehr faktenreich ..." (in: The Science Fiction Jahr 2008, 2008, S. 795 f.)
From the reviews:

"A skeptic's view on the realities of sending a human mission to Mars in the 21st century. ... Human Missions to Mars is hardbound, and Rapp's use of supporting formula, graphs, and technical illustrations ... make it clear that this volume is meant to be used as a reference book in research institutions, technical libraries, and scientific organizations. However, Rapp's engaging writing style and pragmatic view on this subject also makes it an interesting read for the armchair Mars explorer ... ." (Anthony Young, The Space Review, March, 2008)

"This book looks at human missions to Mars from an engineering perspective. ... The book includes appendices describing the use of solar energy on the Moon and on Mars and the value of indigenous water on Mars. This book was written for space scientists and engineers, intermediate-level undergraduates, and postgraduate researchers studying every aspect of human missions to Mars." (The Lunar and Planetary Information Bulletin, 2008)

"Rapp's book is a very readable, critical view of possible explorations of Mars. ... The book discusses in detail the many technologies that must be developed and demonstrated before a successful human mission to Mars can occur. ... The appendixes give significant details about solar energy and water on Earth's moon and Mars. The work is an excellent analysis of the difficulties posed by a human mission to mars. ... Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduate through professional collections." (D. B. Mason, CHOICE, Vol. 45 (9), 2008)

"In this book, Donald Rapp ... sets out to provide a critical assessment of the requirements for human missions to Mars from an engineering perspective. ... I found it informative because I learned a lot about the intricacies of Mars mission architectures and the inherent engineering challenges. ... it is refreshing to read a detailed and independent study by someone who has no vested interest in any 'official' plans for humanspace missions." (Ian Crawford, Eos, Vol. 89 (36), 2008)
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