Principles of Urban Retail Planning and Development (eBook, ePUB) - Gibbs, Robert
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Produktdetails
  • Verlag: John Wiley & Sons
  • Seitenzahl: 256
  • Erscheinungstermin: 22.11.2011
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9781118127735
  • Artikelnr.: 37361838

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Inhaltsangabe
Foreword xi Preface xv Acknowledgments xvii Introduction xix Chapter 1: Retailing Fundamentals 1 1.1 Retail Theory 1 1.2 Shopping Center Business Models 4 1.3 Corner Stores 5 1.4 Convenience Centers 6 1.5 Neighborhood Centers 8 1.6 Community Centers 11 1.7 Regional Centers 12 1.8 Lifestyle Centers and Town Centers 13 1.9 Outlet Centers 17 1.10 Urban Transect: Hamlets
Villages
Towns
Cities
and Metropolises 18 Chapter 2: Retailer Business Models 21 2.1 Hobby Retailers 21 2.2 Small Owner-Operated Businesses 22 2.3 Income-Producing
Owner-Run Businesses 23 2.4 Regional and National Chains 24 2.5 Franchise Stores 25 Chapter 3: Retail Anchors 27 3.1 Form Follows Anchor 28 3.2 Scale 29 3.3 Historic Downtowns 30 3.4 Anchor Business Models 32 3.5 Anchor Placement 33 3.6 Anchor Expansion 33 3.7 Anchor Replacement 34 3.8 Alternative Anchors 35 3.9 Shopping Center Anchor Types 35 3.10 New Design Trends 39 Chapter 4: Downtown Commerce: Challenges and Opportunities 43 4.1 Market Shifts 43 4.2 Peak Retail Market Share 44 4.3 Urban Market Share Decline 45 4.4 Converting Downtowns to Malls: A Failed Experiment 46 4.5 Urban Commercial Challenges 47 4.6 Rents 47 4.7 Space Limitations 48 Chapter 5: Economically Sustainable Commercial Urbanism 49 5.1 Advantages of Strong Retail Sales 49 5.2 Consumer Demand and Preferences 50 5.3 Market Research 52 5.4 Worker Expenditures 53 5.5 Tourist Expenditures 54 Chapter 6: Shopping Center Built-Form Types 57 6.1 Strip Center 57 6.2 Linear Strip Center 57 6.3 Single L Center 59 6.4 U Courtyard Center 60 6.5 Double Reverse L Center 61 6.6 Lifestyle or Main Street Centers 64 6.7 Dumbbell Center 65 6.8 Market Square Center 67 6.9 Double Market Square Center 71 6.10 Floating Main Street 73 6.11 Linear Square Center 74 6.12 Half Block Center 76 6.13 Retail Crescent Center 78 6.14 Deflected Blocks Center 79 Chapter 7: Planning and Urban Design 81 7.1 Urban Merchandising Planning Theory 81 7.2 Shopping and Weather 82 7.3 The Public Realm 83 7.4 Sidewalks 84 7.5 Site Furnishings 85 7.6 Street Trees 86 7.7 Tree Impacts on Shopping 88 7.8 Tree Selection 89 7.9 Street Lighting 90 7.10 Outside Dining 92 7.11 Plazas
Squares
Greens
and Courts 92 7.12 Way-Finding Signage 95 Chapter 8: Parking 97 8.1 Parking Demand 97 8.2 Historical Information on Parking Ratios and Indices 98 8.3 Neighborhood Center Parking 100 8.4 Community Center Parking 103 8.5 Regional Center Parking 103 8.6 Lifestyle Center Parking 104 8.7 Village and Town Downtown Parking 105 8.8 Large Town and City Parking 106 8.9 On-Street Parking 107 8.10 Parking Garages and Decks 108 8.11 Parking Meters 110 Chapter 9: Store Planning and Visual Merchandising 113 9.1 Storefront Design Theory 113 9.2 Signage 115 9.3 Awnings 117 9.4 Visual Merchandising 118 9.5 Storefront Design Recommendations 120 9.6 Store Lighting 121 9.7 Lighting Recommendations 123 9.8 Specialty Niche Focus and Cross-Merchandising 123 9.9 Store Maintenance 125 Chapter 10: Retail Development Finance 127 10.1 Methods for Analyzing Real Estate Development 127 10.2 Parking Structures 129 10.3 Vertical Stacking of Mixed-Use Projects 130 10.4 The Push for Local Retailers 130 10.5 Elements of Making Deals with Retail Tenants 131 10.6 Purpose of Public Subsidy 133 Chapter 11: Leasing--The Lifeblood of the Deal 135 11.1 Operating Covenants 136 11.2 Permitted Use and Exclusive Use 137 11.3 Co-tenancy Clauses 138 11.4 Sales-Driven Provisions: Percentage Rent
Radius Clauses
and Early Termination 139 11.5 Maintenance 140 11.6 Signage 140 11.7 Assignment 141 Chapter 12: Management and Operations 143 12.1 Central Management 143 12.2 Cost-Benefit Metrics 145 12.3 Special Events: How Do They Impact Sales? 146 12.4 Business Recruitment and Leasing 148 12.5 Pop-up Stores 148 12.6 Defensive Management Practices 149 12.7 General Guidelines for Commercial Center Management 152 Chapter 13: Platted Town Centers 155 13.1 Background 155 13.2 Land Speculation 156 13.3 Building Standards 157 13.4 Management 158 13.5 Parking 158 13.6 Alleys 159 13.7 Regulated Use 159 13.8 Operating Standards 159 13.9 Recommended Minimum Operating Standards 160 13.10 Developer Responsibilities 160 Chapter 14: Case Studies: Historic City Centers 163 14.1 Bay City
Michigan 163 14.2 Alexandria
Virginia's Old Town 164 14.3 Ballwin
Missouri 169 14.4 Birmingham and Pontiac
Michigan 170 14.5 Charleston
South Carolina 172 14.6 Damariscotta
Maine 174 14.7 Fresno
California 176 14.8 Houston
Texas 177 14.9 Naples
Florida 181 14.10 Oxford
Mississippi 182 14.11 Santa Ana
California 184 14.12 Santa Cruz
California 187 14.13 St. Andrews
Scotland 188 14.14 Wasilla
Alaska 191 Chapter 15: Case Studies: New Town Centers 197 15.1 Birkdale Village
Huntersville
North Carolina 197 15.2 Daybreak Village
South Jordan
Utah 198 15.3 East Fraserlands
Vancouver
British Columbia 198 15.4 Easton Town Center
Columbus
Ohio 200 15.5 Middleton Hills
Middleton Hills
Wisconsin 201 15.6 The Glen Town Center
Glenview
Illinois 202 15.7 The Grove
Los Angeles
California 203 15.8 Mashpee Commons
Mashpee (Cape Cod)
Massachusetts 205 15.9 San Elijo Hills Town Center
San Marcos
California 206 15.10 Rosemary Beach
Fort Walton County
Florida 207 15.11 Seabrook
Washington 209 15.12 Seaside
Florida 210 15.13 University Place Town Center
University Place
Washington 212 15.14 The Village of Rochester Hills
Rochester Hills
Michigan 214 Endnotes 217 Index 221
Rezensionen
"Robert J. Gibbs, a charter member of the Congress for the New Urbanism, looks at what it takes to build a shopping center that thrives. He outlines every ingredient, from business models. . . and structure. . . to storefront design and parking." (Landscape Architecture Magazine, May 2012)

"Every component of this book is organized systematically. Gibbs conveys his expertise with rigorous clarity. This guide should prove invaluable for anyone who wants to do retail in a way that adds to a community's character and also makes economic sense." (Better! Cities & Towns, March 2012)

"His book will be most useful to private-sector planners and those who work with public-private partnerships. But the material it contains will also be helpful to public planners dealing with zoning issues." (Planning Magazine, March 2012)

"The book has chapters on big topics like lease language and making smart use of anchor tenants." (Shoppingcenterreporter.com, February 2012)