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Mikhail Bulgakov's astonishing Russian masterpiece, which has been translated into more than twenty languages, with an introduction by Orlando Figes.

Produktbeschreibung
Mikhail Bulgakov's astonishing Russian masterpiece, which has been translated into more than twenty languages, with an introduction by Orlando Figes.
  • Produktdetails
  • Macmillan Collector's Library
  • Verlag: Pan Macmillan
  • Seitenzahl: 560
  • Erscheinungstermin: 5. September 2019
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 155mm x 103mm x 30mm
  • Gewicht: 300g
  • ISBN-13: 9781529012118
  • ISBN-10: 1529012112
  • Artikelnr.: 57552959
Autorenporträt
Mikhail Bulgakov was born in 1891 in Kiev, in present-day Ukraine. He first trained in medicine but gave up his profession as a doctor to pursue writing. He started working on The Master and Margarita in 1928 but due to censorship it was not published until 1966, more than twenty-five years after Bulgakov's death.
Rezensionen
"This book is absorbing, brilliant slapstick, and looks deep in to the heart of fantasy and longing" Sunday Times
Rhind-Tutt cleverly indulges the satire and the fantasy in a novel unpublished until 26 years after Bulgakov's death. The absurdity of the Stalinist system is inventively mocked, Christ is sympathetically re-examined and over all is a layer of idiosyncratic fantasy. - Rachel Redford, The Observer First published 26 years after his death in 1940, Bulgakov's extraordinary satire of life under the political, cultural, religious and bureaucratic strictures of Stalinist tyranny has been variously described as Solzhenitsyn crossed with Lewis Carroll and the most powerful Russian novel of the 20th century. His cast of characters, real and imaginary, make Dickens's dramatis personae appear sparse. Bulgakov's include Pontius Pilate, a talking cat who puts on black-rimmed spectacles to read official documents quite often upside down, the devil at whose annual grand ball Stravinsky conducts the band, a poet imprisoned in a psychiatric asylum not unconnected with the Master of the title, and his ever-faithful lover Margarita. Ah, Margarita - what a woman. But maybe I'd be, too, if I had the magic ointment that makes one look 10 years younger. It sounds like a test run for botox. She makes a Faustian pact with the devil for true love's sake so that the Master can write his precious books without fear of arrest. A classic that can be read on many levels, it's played strictly for laughs by Julian Rhind-Tutt. But there is a much darker side. - Sue Arnold, The Guardian