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This is Political Philosophy is an accessible and well-balanced introduction to the main issues in political philosophy written by an author team from the fields of both philosophy and politics. This text connects issues at the core of political philosophy with current, live debates in policy, politics, and law and addresses different ideals of political organization, such as democracy, liberty, equality, justice, and happiness. Written with great clarity, This is Political Philosophy is accessible and engaging to those who have little or no prior knowledge of political philosophy and is…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
This is Political Philosophy is an accessible and well-balanced introduction to the main issues in political philosophy written by an author team from the fields of both philosophy and politics. This text connects issues at the core of political philosophy with current, live debates in policy, politics, and law and addresses different ideals of political organization, such as democracy, liberty, equality, justice, and happiness. Written with great clarity, This is Political Philosophy is accessible and engaging to those who have little or no prior knowledge of political philosophy and is supported with supplemental pedagogical and instructor material on the This Is Philosophy series site. Available at https://www.wiley.com/en-us/thisisphilosophy/thisispoliticalphilosophyanintroduction

Dieser Download kann aus rechtlichen Gründen nur mit Rechnungsadresse in A, D ausgeliefert werden.

  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: John Wiley & Sons
  • Seitenzahl: 296
  • Erscheinungstermin: 16.12.2016
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9781118766040
  • Artikelnr.: 47392650
Autorenporträt
Alex Tuckness is a Professor at Iowa State University in the departments of Political Science and Philosophy. His research focuses on toleration, mercy, punishment, international humanitarianism, and public service ethics. He is the author of Locke and the Legislative Point of View (2002) and The Decline of Mercy in Public Life (with John Michael Parrish, 2014) as well as numerous articles. Clark Wolf is Professor at Iowa State University in the departments of Philosophy and Political Science. His research focuses on issues in the theory of justice, the philosophy of law, and bioethics. His work on law, intergenerational justice, political liberalism, intellectual property, reproductive ethics, and environmental ethics have appeared in Ethics and other major journals.
Inhaltsangabe
How to Use this Book xi

Preface xiii

Part I The Problem of Authority 1

1 Happiness 3

Doing Political Philosophy 4

Happiness, Welfare, and the Aims of Government 5

If You're Happy Do You Know It? 5

The Pursuit of Happiness 6

Whose happiness? 7

Can you measure pleasure? 8

Future happiness 10

Pleasure and pain 11

Is happiness fulfilling your desires? 12

Do the ends justify the means? 14

Nozick's Experience Machine 14

Happiness and virtue 15

The case of John Stuart Mill 17

Capabilities 18

Conflicts between liberty and happiness 22

Conflicts between equality and happiness 22

Happiness and Government 23

Happiness and Public Goods 24

Free Riding and Small Contributions 25

Philosophical objections 26

Should we evaluate political institutions according to their ability to make people happy? 27

References and Further Reading 28

Online Resources 30

2 Freedom 31

The Meaning of Freedom 34

The Fundamental Question 34

What Is Freedom? And Who Is Free? 35

Subjective and objective freedom 36

What counts as restraining freedom? 37

Freedom and consent 38

Republican liberty 39

Private freedom and public freedom 40

Negative and positive liberty 41

Paternalism, the Harm Principle, and Moralism 42

Paternalism 42

The harm principle 44

Moralism 48

Can (and should) we avoid moralism? 50

Conclusion 51

References and Further Reading 52

Online Resources 53

3 Equality 54

Introduction 55

How Unequal Are People in the United States? 56

Against Equality: A Politics of Procrustes? 57

Unequal Treatment and Discrimination 59

Equality as a Baseline? 61

Equality of Resources and Luck Egalitarianism 62

First objection: Disabilities 62

Second objection: Slavery of the talented 63

Third objection: Expensive tastes 63

Equality of Opportunity 64

Should we level down? 66

What Does Equality of Opportunity Require? 67

Inequalities in the Real World 68

Inequality or Deprivation? 71

Is Sufficiency Enough? 73

Complex Equality 73

Race, Gender,and the Social Construction of Inequalities 75

Affirmative Action 76

Conclusion 78

References and Further Reading 78

Online Resources 80

4 Justice 81

Justice: A Brief Introduction 82

Rawls's Theory of Justice 83

The original principle and the veil of ignorance 84

Rawls's two principles of justice 85

The Libertarian Critique: Individual Liberty Restricts Redistribution 87

Utilitarian Critique: An Alternative Rationale for Redistribution 91

Feminist Critique: The Public-Private Distinction and Power Relations 93

Communitarian Critique: Alternatives to Individualism 96

Cosmopolitan Critique: The Demands of Global Justice 97

Conclusion 99

References and Further Reading 99

Online Resources 101

Part II Core Values in Political Philosophy 103

5 Democracy 105

Democracy and Political Self-Governance 107

What Is Democracy? 108

Who Gets to Participate? 108

Constitutional Democracy and Rights 110

Sources of rights 111

Claim and liberty rights 113

Interest and choicetheories of rights 114

Benefits of Democracy: The Instrumental Case 115

Would a kind dictator be a bad thing? 115

Do the people know best? 116

Can representation help? 117

Is Democratic Self-Governance Intrinsically Valuable? 118

Is There a Right to Democratic Self-Governance? 119

What Are the Implications of a Right to Democratic Self-Governance? 120

Voting and Representation: Interests or Ideals? 122

Does Democracy Rest on a Paradox? 123

Deliberative Democracy as a Solution? 125

Distorting Democracy: Persistent Minorities and Electoral Inequalities 126

Persistent minorities 126

Electoral inequalities 126

Do Democracies Decline and Fall? 128

References and Further Reading 130

Online Resources 131

6 The Obligation to Obey the Law 132

Breaking the Law 135

Motives for break