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    Broschiertes Buch

Trigonometry has always been an underappreciated branch of mathematics. It has a reputation as a dry and difficult subject, a glorified form of geometry complicated by tedious computation. In this book, Eli Maor draws on his remarkable talents as a guide to the world of numbers to dispel that view. Rejecting the usual arid descriptions of sine, cosine, and their trigonometric relatives, he brings the subject to life in a compelling blend of history, biography, and mathematics. He presents both a survey of the main elements of trigonometry and a unique account of its vital contribution to…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Trigonometry has always been an underappreciated branch of mathematics. It has a reputation as a dry and difficult subject, a glorified form of geometry complicated by tedious computation. In this book, Eli Maor draws on his remarkable talents as a guide to the world of numbers to dispel that view. Rejecting the usual arid descriptions of sine, cosine, and their trigonometric relatives, he brings the subject to life in a compelling blend of history, biography, and mathematics. He presents both a survey of the main elements of trigonometry and a unique account of its vital contribution to science and social development. Woven together in a tapestry of entertaining stories, scientific curiosities, and educational insights, the book more than lives up to the title Trigonometric Delights.
  • Produktdetails
  • Princeton Science Library
  • Verlag: Princeton Univers. Press
  • Seitenzahl: 236
  • Erscheinungstermin: April 2013
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 233mm x 151mm x 20mm
  • Gewicht: 360g
  • ISBN-13: 9780691158204
  • ISBN-10: 0691158207
  • Artikelnr.: 36841313
Autorenporträt
Eli Maor teaches the history of mathematics at Loyola University in Chicago. He is the author of To Infinity and Beyond, e: The Story of a Number, Venus in Transit, and The Pythagorean Theorem: A 4,000-Year History.
Rezensionen
"Maor clearly has a great love of trigonometry, formulas and all, and his enthusiasm shines through. . . . If you always wanted to know where trigonometry came from, and what it's good for, you'll find plenty here to enlighten you."--Ian Stewart, New Scientist