Love and Reading - Butler, Gerald J.

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Love and Reading discusses 18th and 19th Century English fiction, the aesthetics of Burke and Kant, and contemporary literary theory. It stresses that language should be referential and argues for a way of reading that would not provide narcissistic gratification: a way of reading that would enable us instead to see through "the huge and terrible deception," as Tolstoy put it, that hides "both life and death."…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Love and Reading discusses 18th and 19th Century English fiction, the aesthetics of Burke and Kant, and contemporary literary theory. It stresses that language should be referential and argues for a way of reading that would not provide narcissistic gratification: a way of reading that would enable us instead to see through "the huge and terrible deception," as Tolstoy put it, that hides "both life and death."
  • Produktdetails
  • American University Studies
  • Verlag: Peter Lang Ltd. International Academic Publishers
  • Artikelnr. des Verlages: .60763, 60763
  • Neuausg.
  • Erscheinungstermin: 1. Dezember 1988
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 226mm x 154mm x 16mm
  • Gewicht: 340g
  • ISBN-13: 9780820407630
  • ISBN-10: 0820407631
  • Artikelnr.: 24465876
Inhaltsangabe
Contents: The Freudian and Classical Conception of Love - Print Eroticism - Beauty and the Rationalization of Pleasure in the 18th Century - Purity and Sensation in Victorian Fiction - Non-Representational Desire - Love and Reading. Drawing on psychoanalysis in new ways, Love and Reading challenges prevailing theories of criticism and reading of fiction.
Rezensionen
"...it develops a theory of fiction that provides a viable alternative to Structuralist and Post-structuralist theories." (Wayne Burns, University of Washington) "The entire work is an impressive scholarly and critical achievement, drawing on the author's considerable knowledge of philosophy, psychology, and literature for support of its central thesis: that we have lost our humanity in an increasingly technically-oriented world - and that literature can but usually does not offer us a way of recovering that loss". (Elsie Adams, San Diego State University)