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A beautiful version with 130 original Henrique Correa illustrations The War of the Worlds is a captivating science fiction novel that appeared in hardcover in 1898. It is one of the earliest stories to detail a conflict between mankind and an extraterrestrial race. The novel is the first-person narrative as southern England is invaded by Martians who possess devastating weapons. The novel has been variously interpreted as a commentary on evolutionary theory, British imperialism, and generally Victorian superstitions, fears, and prejudices. The story has also been made into a number of movies,…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
A beautiful version with 130 original Henrique Correa illustrations The War of the Worlds is a captivating science fiction novel that appeared in hardcover in 1898. It is one of the earliest stories to detail a conflict between mankind and an extraterrestrial race. The novel is the first-person narrative as southern England is invaded by Martians who possess devastating weapons. The novel has been variously interpreted as a commentary on evolutionary theory, British imperialism, and generally Victorian superstitions, fears, and prejudices. The story has also been made into a number of movies, TV shows, and radio dramas. It was most memorably dramatized in a 1938 radio program that caused public panic among listeners who did not know the Martian invasion was fictional. The novel has even influenced the work of rocket scientists in their quest to land on the moon.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: MiraVista Interactive
  • Seitenzahl: 216
  • Erscheinungstermin: 7. Mai 2019
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 229mm x 152mm x 12mm
  • Gewicht: 358g
  • ISBN-13: 9781950435302
  • ISBN-10: 195043530X
  • Artikelnr.: 56545769
Autorenporträt
Herbert George Wells (21 September 1866 - 13 August 1946) was an English writer. He was prolific in many genres, writing dozens of novels, short stories, and works of social commentary, satire, biography, and autobiography, and even including two books on recreational war games. He is now best remembered for his science fiction novels and is often called a "father of science fiction", along with Jules Verne and Hugo Gernsback.[5][6][a] During his own lifetime, however, he was most prominent as a forward-looking, even prophetic social critic who devoted his literary talents to the development of a progressive vision on a global scale. A futurist, he wrote a number of utopian works and foresaw the advent of aircraft, tanks, space travel, nuclear weapons, satellite television and something resembling the World Wide Web.[7] His science fiction imagined time travel, alien invasion, invisibility, and biological engineering. Brian Aldiss referred to Wells as the "Shakespeare of science fiction".[8] Wells rendered his works convincing by instilling commonplace detail alongside a single extraordinary assumption - dubbed "Wells's law" - leading Joseph Conrad to hail him in 1898 as "O Realist of the Fantastic!".[9] His most notable science fiction works include The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898) and the military science fiction The War in the Air (1907). Wells was nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature four times.[10] Wells's earliest specialised training was in biology, and his thinking on ethical matters took place in a specifically and fundamentally Darwinian context.[11] He was also from an early date an outspoken socialist, often (but not always, as at the beginning of the First World War) sympathising with pacifist views. His later works became increasingly political and didactic, and he wrote little science fiction, while he sometimes indicated on official documents that his profession was that of journalist.[12] Novels such as Kipps and The History of Mr Polly, which describe lower-middle-class life, led to the suggestion that he was a worthy successor to Charles Dickens,[13]but Wells described a range of social strata and even attempted, in Tono-Bungay (1909), a diagnosis of English society as a whole. A diabetic, Wells co-founded the charity The Diabetic Association (known today as Diabetes UK) in 1934 Herbert George Wells was born at Atlas House, 162 High Street in Bromley, Kent,[15] on 21 September 1866.[4] Called "Bertie" in the family, he was the fourth and last child of Joseph Wells (a former domestic gardener, and at the time a shopkeeper and professional cricketer) and his wife, Sarah Neal (a former domestic servant). An inheritance had allowed the family to acquire a shop in which they sold china and sporting goods, although it failed to prosper: the stock was old and worn out, and the location was poor. Joseph Wells managed to earn a meagre income, but little of it came from the shop and he received an unsteady amount of money from playing professional cricket for the Kent county team.[16] Payment for skilled bowlers and batsmen came from voluntary donations afterwards, or from small payments from the clubs where matches were played.
Rezensionen
I personally consider the greatest of English living writers [to be] H.G. Wells. Upton Sinclair

Perlentaucher-Notiz zur Süddeutsche Zeitung-Rezension

Gut, wir wissen es: H.G. Wells "The War of the Worlds" ist ein Hörspiel, ein geniales, das 1938 tausende Amerikaner für bare Münzen genommen haben und schreiend auf die Flucht vor den Außerirdischen getrieben hat. Auch Christoph Schmaus gesteht, dass er sich köstlich über die damalige Panik amüsieren konnte und - ganz abgeklärt - die Raffinesse des Hörspiels bewundern. Aber, meint er , es funktioniert immer noch: "Der Horror kennt kein Entkommen." Nur zum Teil schreibt Schmaus dies aber der großartigen Adaption von Orson Welles zugute, der tückischen Einbettung ins normale Radioprogramm. Vielmehr sieht er nämlich die spezifische Macht des Radio als Medium wirken, dessen körperlosen Stimmen keinen Halt und dessen Flüchtigkeit keine Zeit zur Reflexion lassen. "Das Grauen bahnt sich seinen Weg direkt zu den Hörern", seufzt Schmaus wohlig und sieht ein Höchstmaß an Perfidie dann erreicht, wenn gar nichts mehr zu hören ist.

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