The Combat Soldier: Infantry Tactics and Cohesion in the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries - King, Anthony
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Combat Soldiers is a work of historical, comparative sociology examining the evolution of infantry tactics in the American, Australian, Canadian, British, French, German, and Italian armies from the First World War to the present in order to address a key question in the social sciences of how social solidarity (cohesion) is generated and sustained…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Combat Soldiers is a work of historical, comparative sociology examining the evolution of infantry tactics in the American, Australian, Canadian, British, French, German, and Italian armies from the First World War to the present in order to address a key question in the social sciences of how social solidarity (cohesion) is generated and sustained
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: OXFORD UNIV PR
  • Seitenzahl: 538
  • Erscheinungstermin: 22. April 2013
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 236mm x 160mm x 33mm
  • Gewicht: 1066g
  • ISBN-13: 9780199658848
  • ISBN-10: 0199658846
  • Artikelnr.: 36720413
Autorenporträt
Anthony King has written extensively on social theory, football, and the armed forces, including his most recent book 'The Transformation of Europe's Armed Forces: from the Rhine to Afghanistan', published by Cambridge University Press in 2011. As a result of his research, he has developed close relations with the armed forces, especially the Royal Marines. He has co-written parts of current British military doctrine on stabilisation and has advised on the campaign in Afghanistan as a member of NATO's Regional Command South Headquarters in Kandahar in 2009-10. He was recently appointed as a mentor by the Army's Force Development and Training Command as it tries to reform and restructure the army. He has contributed to public debates about contemporary security and defence policy, giving evidence on operations in Afghanistan to the Parliamentary Defence Committee, writing and speaking for some think-tanks. He is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Exeter.