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Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911) was educated as a teacher. She became a professional lecturer, activist, suffragette, poet, essayist, novelist, and the author of the first published short story written by an African-American woman. Her work spanned more than sixty years. She joined the American Anti-Slavery Society as a traveling lecturer. First serialized in The Christian Recorder Trial and Triumph was first written for African-Americans. It address issues of passing, social responsibility, sexuality, and temperance. An excerpt reads, "What is the matter now, Aunt Susan? What has…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911) was educated as a teacher. She became a professional lecturer, activist, suffragette, poet, essayist, novelist, and the author of the first published short story written by an African-American woman. Her work spanned more than sixty years. She joined the American Anti-Slavery Society as a traveling lecturer. First serialized in The Christian Recorder Trial and Triumph was first written for African-Americans. It address issues of passing, social responsibility, sexuality, and temperance. An excerpt reads, "What is the matter now, Aunt Susan? What has Annette been doing?" "Doing! She is always doing something; everlastingly getting herself into trouble with some of the neighbors. She is the most mischievous and hard-headed child I ever saw." "Well what has she been doing this morning which has so upset you?" "Why, I sent her to the grocery to have the oil can filled, and after she came back she had not been in the house five minutes before there came such an uproar from Mrs. Larkins', my next door neighbor, that I thought her house was on fire, but----" "Instead of that her tongue was on fire, and I know what that means." "Yes, that's just it, and I don't wonder. That little minx sitting up there in the corner looking so innocent, stopped to pour oil on her clean steps. Now you know yourself what an aggravating thing that must have been."
Autorenporträt
Frances Ellen Watkins Harper (1825-1911) was an African American abolitionist, suffragist, poet, and novelist. Born free in Baltimore, Maryland, Harper became one of the first women of color to publish in the United States when her debut poetry collection Forest Leaves appeared in 1845. In 1850, she began to teach sewing at Union Seminary in Columbus, Ohio. The following year, alongside chairman of the Pennsylvania Abolition Society William Still, she began working as an abolitionist in earnest, helping slaves escape to Canada along the Underground Railroad. In 1854, having established herself as a prominent public speaker and political activist, Harper published Poems on Miscellaneous Subjects, a resounding critical and commercial success. Over the course of her life, Harper founded and participated in several progressive organizations, including the Women's Christian Temperance Union and the National Association of Colored Women. At the age of sixty-seven, Harper published Iola Leroy, or Shadows Uplifted, becoming one of the first African American women to publish a novel.