Language of Defendants in the 17 th -Century English Courtroom (eBook, PDF) - Cecconi, Elisabetta
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This volume analyses the defence system in the 17th-century English courtroom and sees how defendants attempted to construct their discourse identity and articulate their defence in the arraignment section and in the evidence phase of the trial. Drawing upon theories from socio-pragmatics and (critical) discourse analysis the book investigates the complex face-work dynamics operating between defendants and professionals/witnesses, the main defence strategies adopted in the evidence phase and - at the author-readership discourse level - the way in which Royalist defendants were represented in…mehr

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Produktbeschreibung
This volume analyses the defence system in the 17th-century English courtroom and sees how defendants attempted to construct their discourse identity and articulate their defence in the arraignment section and in the evidence phase of the trial. Drawing upon theories from socio-pragmatics and (critical) discourse analysis the book investigates the complex face-work dynamics operating between defendants and professionals/witnesses, the main defence strategies adopted in the evidence phase and - at the author-readership discourse level - the way in which Royalist defendants were represented in Royalist accounts in the turbulent years of the Civil War. The author draws on a rich variety of trial texts: from high treason to religious subversion, from murder to felony and misdemeanour. In each case the defendant's discourse behaviour is scrutinised in relation to historical, socio-cultural and institutional variables. In its double focus on the defendants' interactional role in the trial and their representation in Royalist accounts, the book offers a valuable reading for historical courtroom linguists, legal historians and researchers in the field of language, ideology and political propaganda in the early modern period.

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Autorenporträt
Elisabetta Cecconi holds a PhD in English and American studies. She is currently Contract Professor in English language at the University of Florence. She is the author of several articles in the field of 17th-century courtroom discourse and 17th-century news discourse and propaganda.
Inhaltsangabe
Contents: The 17 th -century English courtroom and its participants - Face-work dynamics between defendants and professionals in the arraignment section of the trial - Prisoners' defence strategies in the (cross) examination phase - Discourse representation of defendants as a form of political propaganda in the period of the Civil War.
Rezensionen
"(...) the book is very interesting, involving and useful. It extensively and clearly covers all aspects of the defence system in the 17th century English courtroom and it reaches out to a great number of scholars interested in different areas of expertise." (Anna Ewa Majek, The Linguist List 03/2013)
"This is a fascinating book, both in terms of its level of scholarship and usability, and also in terms of its ability to make socio-pragmatic analysis accessible to researchers and practitioners from other fields who want to benefit from this approach to data to make a difference in the standards of practice in their community, or strike out in a new direction in the fields of historical- and socio-pragmatics." (Isamar Coromoto Carrillo Masso, Discourse Studies 16, 2014/3)