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In the last decade there has been an explosion of interest in viraltherapies for cancer. Viral agents have been developed that areharmless to normal tissues but selectively able to kill cancercells. These agents have been endowed with additional selectivityand potency through genetic manipulation. Increasingly theseviruses are undergoing evaluation in clinical trials, both assingle agents and in combination with standard chemotherapy andradiotherapy. This book provides a comprehensive yet succinct overview of thecurrent status of viral therapy of cancer. Chapters coherentlypresent the advances…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
In the last decade there has been an explosion of interest in viraltherapies for cancer. Viral agents have been developed that areharmless to normal tissues but selectively able to kill cancercells. These agents have been endowed with additional selectivityand potency through genetic manipulation. Increasingly theseviruses are undergoing evaluation in clinical trials, both assingle agents and in combination with standard chemotherapy andradiotherapy. This book provides a comprehensive yet succinct overview of thecurrent status of viral therapy of cancer. Chapters coherentlypresent the advances made with individual agents and review thebiological and clinical background to a range of viral therapies:structured to proceed from basic science at the bench to thepatient's bedside, they give an up-to-date and realisticevaluation of a therapy's potential utility for the cancerpatient. * Presents state of the art knowledge on how viruses can be, andhave been, used in novel therapeutic approaches for the treatmentof cancer * Describes the use of viruses as oncolytic agents, killing cellsdirectly * Editors are experts in the field, with experience of bothlaboratory and clinical research Viral Therapy of Cancer is essential reading for bothbasic scientists and clinicians with an interest in viral therapyand gene therapy.

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  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: John Wiley & Sons
  • Seitenzahl: 432
  • Erscheinungstermin: 2. August 2008
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9780470985786
  • Artikelnr.: 37301358
Autorenporträt
Dr K. J. Harrington, Targeted Therapy Laboratory, Cancer Research UK, Centre for Cell and Molecular Biology, Institute of Cancer Research, London, UK. Dr H. S. Pandha, Department of Medical Oncology, St. George's Hospital Medical School, London, UK. Professor R. G. Vile, Molecular Medicine Program,?Mayo Clinic, Rochester, USA.
Inhaltsangabe
Foreword. Preface. Contributors. 1. Adenoviruses (Kate Relph
Kevin J. Harrington
Alan Melcher and Hardev S. Pandha). References. 2. Application of HSV-1 Vectors to the treatment of cancer (Paola Grandi
Kiflai Bein
Costas G. Hadjipanayis
Darren Wolfe
Xandra O. Breakefield and Joseph C. Glorioso). Acknowledgements. References. 3. Adeno-associated virus (Selvarangan Ponnazhagan). Acknowledgements. References. 4. Retroviruses (Simon Chowdhury and Yasuhiro Ikeda). 4/6 Safety of retroviral vectors: insertional mutagenesis. References. 5. Lentiviral vectors for cancer gene therapy (Antonia Follenzi and Elisa Vigna). References. 6. Poxviruses as immunomodulatory cancer therapeutics (Kevin J. Harrington
Hardev S. Pandha and Richard G. Vile). References. 7. Oncolytic herpes simplex viruses (Guy R. Simpson and Robert S. Coffin). Acknowledgement. References. 8. Selective tumour cell cytotoxicity by reoviridae - preclinical evidence and clinical trial results (Laura Vidal
Matt Coffey and Johann de Bono). References. 9. Oncolytic vaccinia (M. Firdos Ziauddin and David L. Bartlett). References. 10. Newcastle Disease virus: a promising vector for viral therapy of cancer (Volker Schirrmacher and Philippe Fournier). References. 11. Vesicular stomatitis virus (John Bell
Kelly Parato and Harold Atkins). References. 12. Measles as an oncolytic virus (Adele Fielding). References. 13. Alphaviruses (Ryuya Yamanaka). References. 14. Tumour-suppressor gene therapy (Bingliang Fang and Jack A. Roth). Acknowledgements. References. 15. RNA interference and dominant negative approaches (Charlotte Moss and Nick Lemoine). References. 16. Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (Silke Schepelmann
Douglas Hedley
Lesley M. Ogilvie and Caroline J. Springer). References. 17. Immunomodulatory gene therapy (Denise Boulanger and Andrew Bateman). References. 18. Antiangiogenic gene delivery (Anita T. Tandle and Steven K. Libutti). References. 19. Radiosensitization in viral gene therapy (Jula Veerapong
Kai A. Bickenbach and Ralph R. Weichselbaum). References. 20. Radioisotope delivery (Inge D.L. Peerlinck and Georges Vassaux). References. 21. Radioprotective gene therapy: current status and future goals (Joel S. Greenberger and Michael W. Epperly). References. 22. Chemoprotective gene delivery (Michael Milsom
Axel Schambach
David Williams and Christopher Baum). Acknowledgements. References. Index.