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"The 120 Days of Sodom" is arguably the most perverted text ever put to paper. and a literature " classic ".  This novel by Marquis de Sade relates the story of four wealthy men who enslave 24 mostly teenaged victims and sexually torture them while listening to stories told by old prostitutes. The book was written while Sade was imprisoned in the Bastille and the manuscript was lost during the storming of the Bastille. Sade wrote that he "wept tears of blood" over the manuscript's loss. Many consider this to be Sade crowning achievement.…mehr

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Produktbeschreibung
"The 120 Days of Sodom" is arguably the most perverted text ever put to paper. and a literature "classic". 
This novel by Marquis de Sade relates the story of four wealthy men who enslave 24 mostly teenaged victims and sexually torture them while listening to stories told by old prostitutes. The book was written while Sade was imprisoned in the Bastille and the manuscript was lost during the storming of the Bastille. Sade wrote that he "wept tears of blood" over the manuscript's loss. Many consider this to be Sade crowning achievement.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: E-BOOKARAMA
  • Erscheinungstermin: 25. Mai 2019
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9788834120941
  • Artikelnr.: 56848057
Autorenporträt
de Sade, MarquisThe Marquis de Sade was born in Paris in 1740. He was imprisoned several times for his scandalous behaviour, and wrote The 120 Days of Sodom, his most notorious work, while in prison in the Bastille. He managed to ingratiate himself with the new regime after the French Revolution, but by 1796 was a ruined man. He died in an insane asylum in 1814.
Rezensionen
Without in any way giving in to hyperbole, I would say that this translation is a 21st century monument, changing not only the way in which we view the French 18th century, but providing a guide to the present and future Andrew Hussey, Scott Moncrieff Prize judge