What Makes Civilization? (eBook, PDF) - Wengrow, David
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The targeted destruction of ancient sites and monuments in the Middle East provokes widespread outrage in the West. But what is our connection to the ancient Near East? In this updated edition of What Makes Civilization? archaeologist David Wengrow investigates the origins of farming, writing, and cities in ancient Mesopotamia (Iraq) and Egypt, and explores the connections between these two civilizations. It is the story of how people first created kingdomsand monuments to the gods and, just as importantly, how they pioneered everyday practices that we might now take for granted, such as…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
The targeted destruction of ancient sites and monuments in the Middle East provokes widespread outrage in the West. But what is our connection to the ancient Near East? In this updated edition of What Makes Civilization? archaeologist David Wengrow investigates the origins of farming, writing, and cities in ancient Mesopotamia (Iraq) and Egypt, and explores the connections between these two civilizations. It is the story of how people first created kingdomsand monuments to the gods and, just as importantly, how they pioneered everyday practices that we might now take for granted, such as familiar ways of cooking food and keeping the house and body clean. Wengrow asks why these ancient cultures, where so many features of modern life originated, have come tosymbolize the remote and the exotic. Today, perhaps more than ever, he argues, the beleaguered cultural heritage of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia stands as a warning for the future. A warning of the sacrifices people will tolerate to preserve their chosen form of life; of the potential for unfettered expansion that exists within any cultural tradition; and of blood perhaps yet to be spilled, on the altar of a misguided notion of civilization.
  • Produktdetails
  • Verlag: OUP Oxford
  • Erscheinungstermin: 22.07.2010
  • Englisch
  • ISBN-13: 9780191585036
  • Artikelnr.: 38143150
Autorenporträt
David Wengrow is Professor of Comparative Archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He trained in archaeology and anthropology at the University of Oxford, and has conducted fieldwork in both Africa and the Middle East. His research explores early cultural transformations across the boundaries of Asia, Africa, and Europe, including the emergence of the first farming societies, states, and systems of writing. He has also written on the history of archaeological thought and the role of the remote past in shaping modern political identities. His past appointments include Junior Research Fellow at Christ Church, Oxford, and Frankfort Fellow in Near Eastern Art and Archaeology at the Warburg Institute, London.
Inhaltsangabe
Chronological Chart
Preface and Acknowledgements
Introduction: a clash of civilizations?
Part One: The Cauldron of Civilization
1 Camouflaged Borrowings
2 On the Trail of Blue-Haired Gods
3 Neolithic Worlds
4 The (First) Global Village
5 Origin of Cities
6 From the Ganges to the Danube: the Bronze Age
7 Cosmology and Commerce
8 The Labours of Kingship
Part Two: Forgetting the Old Regime
9 Enlightenment from a Dark Source
10 Ruined Regimes: Egypt at the Revolution
Conclusion: What Makes Civilization?
Further Reading
Index