Benutzer
Top-Rezensenten Übersicht

Benutzername: 
miss.mesmerized
Wohnort: 
Deutschland
Über mich: 
https://missmesmerized.wordpress.com/

Bewertungen

Insgesamt 1211 Bewertungen
Bewertung vom 17.06.2022
The Complication: A Camille Delaney Mystery
DuBois, Amanda

The Complication: A Camille Delaney Mystery


sehr gut

Seattle attorney Camille Delaney rushed to the hospital where her friend Dallas Jackson has to undergo an emergency operation with a fatal outcome. When the former nurse accidentally sees his folder, questions arise. What happened in the operation room? And why was nobody aware of the seemingly critical state her friend was in? As her company only represents hospitals and high profile doctors, thus she cannot pursue her inquiries. Instead this brings her to a point where she has to ask herself if she has given up her ideals for the money and status. As a consequence, she decides to run the risk and leaves the company to start her own firm with her first case. She soon realises that nobody wants to talk about Dr Willcox, responsible surgeon in the operation room, but her gut feeling tells her that something is totally going wrong in this hospital.

There are some similarities between the author and her protagonist. Amanda DuBois herself was a trained nurse before she became a lawyer and medical malpractice has been her area of specialisation. “The Complication” is her first novel which highly relies on her profession knowledge combining medical aspects with law. From a seemingly unfortunate operation, the case develops into a complicated conspiracy which brings the protagonist repeatedly into dangerous situations since she has to deal with reckless people who do not care about a single life.

What I liked about the novel was how the medical details were incorporated and explained along the way so that the reader with limited medical knowledge could smoothly follow the action. The characters are authentically drawn, especially Camille’s discussion with her mother about her ideals and principles raising the question what use she makes of her legal capacities while working for a law firm that puts more interest in the billing hours than helping to serve the law was interesting to follow.

Even though I would estimate that the case is realistically depicted with Camille again and again coming to dead ends and only advancing slowly, I would have preferred a higher pace since as a reader, you have a lead and soon know what scheme is behind it all.

Bewertung vom 06.06.2022
Friends Like These
Rosoff, Meg

Friends Like These


ausgezeichnet

Eighteen-year-old Beth arrives in Manhattan in June 1983 with high expectations. An investigative article for her school’s newspaper secured her a prestigious internship at a newspaper and promises to become the summer of her life. However, her welcome is rather unspectacular, the apartment she shares is shabby and she feels like an outsider. At her workplace, too, she soon feels like a stranger, her three fellow interns seem to be much more knowledgeable and move around like fish in the water. She immediately befriends Edie, an outgoing young woman of New York’s high society. Hard work, a completely new life - Beth is overwhelmed by her new life, too overwhelmed to notice that not all is what it seems and therefore, she has to learn the hard way, that New York is a shark’s pond.

Meg Rosoff has created another young adult novel that also attracts adult readers like me. “Friends Like These” tackles not only Beth’s coming-of-age but also friendship at workplaces, the precarious situation of interns and still after so many decades, women’s place when it comes to careers – it does not make much difference that the novel is set four decades in the past.

Beth is the typical bumpkin, she is inexperienced, insecure and does not know how to behave in these unknown surroundings with all the cool people. Edie quickly becomes her mentor and introduces her to the habits and lifestyles of the Big Apple. The difference between the two girls could hardly be greater, but soon, Beth comes to understand that not all is gold that glitters and that what she envies is not what it seems at first.

I thoroughly enjoyed the novel, funny as well as reflective it opens a whirling world that makes you question what you really want in life. A novel of first which can be exciting and hurting at the same time.

Bewertung vom 06.06.2022
To Kill a Troubadour
Walker, Martin

To Kill a Troubadour


ausgezeichnet

Summer could be enjoyable and light hearted but then, the cosy Périgord region is caught in Spain’s trouble with Catalonia’s independence movement. “Les Troubadours”, a local folk group, have published a song supporting autonomy for the region that shares their cultural heritage. The song goes viral and soon not only the Spanish government but also shady groups become aware of the poet and the band. When the police find a sniper’s bullet and a stolen car in the woods, the know that the situation is much more serious than they thought and that people are in real danger as the Troubadours are about to perform a large concert.

Martin Walker continues his series around the French countryside chief of police Bruno Courrèges. Even though also the 15th Dordogne mystery offers a lot to recognise from the former novels, “To Kill a Troubadour” is much more political and takes up a current real life topic. Apart from this, you’ll get exactly what you’d expect from the series: a lot of food to indulge in, history of the region and the French countryside where everybody seems to be friends with everybody.

One would expect the life of a countryside policeman to be rather unspectacular and slow, however, this could not be farer away from Bruno’s reality. Not only do big conflicts come to his cosy province, but also a case of domestic violence demands his full attention.

What I appreciated most, like in other instalments of the series before, was how the cultural heritage was integrated into the plot and teaches about the history you along the way in a perfectly dosed manner.

Full of suspense while offering the well-known French countryside charm, a wonderful read to look forward to summer holidays in France.

Bewertung vom 30.05.2022
The Poet
Reid, Louisa

The Poet


ausgezeichnet

Emma is 25 and a promising poet and PhD student at Oxford. She is researching into a long forgotten female poet named Charlotte Mew whose work she uncovered and analyses. When she, the girl from the north and a middle-class family, came to the prestigious college, she felt like not belonging, her accent revealed her background, but her professor Tom saw something in her. He didn’t tell her that he was still married with kids and she didn’t mind. Now, years later, she finds herself in a toxic relationship. The renowned professor knew how to manipulate the young woman with low self-esteem doubting herself. Despite the success with her own poems, he can exert control over her, her thinking and cleverly gaslights her. He goes even further until she reaches a point where she has to decide to either give up herself or fight.

Louisa Reid’s novel “The Poet” is the portrait of a young woman who encountered the wrong man at the wrong time. She falls for her teacher who is charming, who sparks something in her, who makes her feel special and talented. Yet, she does not realise at which point this positive energy turns into the negative and when his second face is revealed. The power he has over her, the power his position attributes him, bring her into an inferior position from which it is hard to be believed and to escape.

The arrangement of power the author chooses is well-known: male vs. female, older vs. younger, rich background vs. middle class, academic vs. working class. All factors play out for Tom and from the start put him into the position of control. Emma, young and naive, is only too eager to succumb to it since she falls for his intellect and charm. He is idolised by students as well as his colleagues, quite naturally she is flattered by his attention.

On the other hand, we have the manipulative scholars who knows exactly what makes his female students tick. He has noticed Emma’s talent and knows how to profit from it. Systematically, he makes her feel inferior, stresses her weak points – her background, her family, the lack of money – keeps her from progressing with her work. He makes himself the Ubermensch in her view and manages to keep her close as he needs her, too. Not emotionally, but in a very different way.

Wonderfully written in verse and yet, it reads like a novel. Heart-wrenching at times, analytical at others the book immediately seduces and keeps you reading on.

Bewertung vom 29.05.2022
Das Haus der stummen Toten
Sten, Camilla

Das Haus der stummen Toten


ausgezeichnet

Eleanor erlebt das, was niemand erleben sollte: als sie ihre Großmutter Vivianne besuchen will, trifft sie auf deren Mörder. Aufgrund ihrer Gesichtsblindheit kann sie den Täter jedoch nicht identifizieren. Monate später ist sie endlich so weit, sich um den Nachlass zu kümmern und fährt gemeinsam mit ihrem Freund und ihrer Tante nach Solhöga, einem Gut, von dem sie noch nie etwas gehört hat. Ein Notar begleitet sie, um den Bestand des Hofs aufzunehmen. Kaum sind sie angekommen, geschehen seltsame Dinge in den alten Gemäuern. Eleanor scheint ihre Großmutter hören zu können, die sie warnt. Und wo steckt eigentlich der Gutsverwalter? Schnell wird gewiss: ihr Gefühl trügt sie nicht: sie schweben in Lebensgefahr.

Der zweite Thriller der schwedischen Autorin Camilla Sten konnte mich restlos von ihrem Talent, das ihr sicherlich auch durch ihre berühmte Mutter Viveca mitgegeben wurde, überzeugen. „Das Haus der stummen Toten“ zeichnet sich durch eine düstere Atmosphäre aus, die einem immer wieder Schaudern lässt. Man ahnt bald schon, dass vieles nicht so ist, wie es scheint, aber woher die Bedrohung tatsächlich kommt, zeigt sich erst spät.

Der Thriller ist perfekt durchorchestriert: der Mord an der Großmutter, der der jungen Protagonistin noch in den Knochen steckt. Dann das düstere Anwesen, das offenbar mit gutem Grund verheimlicht wurde. Ein mysteriöses Tagebuch, das mehr Fragen aufreißt als es Antworten geben könnte und unerklärliche Vorgänge sowie der Schatten einer Person, die sich offenbar in ihrer Nähe befindet und die Fäden immer enger zieht.

Spannung von Beginn an und ein gut gehütetes Familiengeheimnis, das endlich aufgelöst werden will – ein Psychothriller, wie man ihn sich wünscht.

Bewertung vom 26.05.2022
Vladimir
Jonas, Julia May

Vladimir


ausgezeichnet

The unnamed 58-year-old narrator and her husband John have been teaching in the English department of a small college for years. From the start, they have found a relaxed way in their relationship, not asking too many questions, but being good partners and caring for their daughter. Now, however, a group of former students accuses John of having abused his power to lure them into affairs. At the same time, a new couple shows up at the college, Vladimir and his wife, both charismatic writers who both fascinate equally. The narrator immediately falls for Vladimir, even more after having read his novel, a feeling she hasn’t known for years and all this in the most complicated situation of her marriage.

Admittedly, I was first drawn to the book because of the cover that was used for another novel I read last year and liked a lot. It would have been a pity to overlook Julia May Jonas’ debut “Vladimir” which brilliantly captures the emotional rollercoaster of a woman who – despite her professional success and being highly esteemed – finds herself in exceptional circumstances and has to reassess her life.

Jonas’ novel really captures the zeitgeist of campus life and the big questions of where men and women actually stand – professionally as well as in their relationship. Even though the narrator has an equal job to her husband, she, after decades of teaching, is still only considered “his wife” and not an independent academic. That she, too, is highly affected in her profession by the allegations against her husband is simply a shame, but I fear that this is just how it would be in real life.

They had an agreement on how their relationship should look like, but now, she has to ask herself is this wasn’t one-sided. She actually had taken the classic role of wife and mother, caring much more for their daughter while he was pursuing his affairs. They had an intellectual bond which was stronger than the bodily but this raises questions in her now. Especially when she becomes aware of what creative potential her longing for Vladimir trigger in her.

A novel which provides a lot of food for thought, especially in the middle section when the narrator is confronted with professional consequences due to her husband’s misbehaviour. The author excellently captures the narrator’s oscillating thoughts and emotions making the novel a great read I’d strongly recommend.

Bewertung vom 22.05.2022
Amelia
Burns, Anna

Amelia


sehr gut

In Belfast aufzuwachsen und zu überleben erfordert eine gewisse Gelassenheit und Cleverness. Auch wenn man es nicht so nennt, es herrscht Krieg auf den Straßen und in den Häusern und Kinder wie Amelia Lovett lernen schon in jungen Jahren, wer Freund ist, wer Feind ist und wann ein Feind auch mal zu Freund werden kann, weil es einen anderen, gemeinsamen Feind gibt. Gewalt spielt sich tagtäglich vor ihren Augen ab, gehört zu Leben wie die Schule. Da muss man manchmal gedanklich einfach abschweifen, um all das zu vergessen, was sich um einen rum zuträgt, denn sonst schlägt sich das irgendwann nieder.

Ihr Roman „Milchmann“ wurde mit zahlreichen Preisen ausgezeichnet, darunter dem Man Booker Prize, dem National Book Critics Award und dem Orwell Prize, was die nordirische Autorin Anna Burns weit über ihre Heimat hinaus bekannt machte. „Amelia“ ist ihr Debüt aus dem Jahr 2001, welches ebenfalls von den Kritikern begeistert aufgenommen wurde und für zahlreiche Preise nominiert war. Beide Romane haben gemein, dass die Autorin mit einer ungeschönten, direkten Sprache das alltägliche Grauen, dem die Mädchen bzw. junge Frauen ausgesetzt sind, schildert und den Leser damit ins Mark trifft. Es ist manchmal nur schwer auszuhalten – verglichen jedoch mit der Realität, die sie einfängt, ist das Lesen ein Klacks, wenn man es sich realistischer Weise vor Augen führt.

Die Kinder leben während der Troubles eine Normalität, die man sich kaum vorstellen kann. Tote, Blut, Gewaltexzesse – nichts bringt sie mehr aus der Ruhe, weil es so normal ist, dass im Puppenwagen genauso gut eine Bombe wie eine Puppe liegen könnte oder dass der Vater oder Bruder morgen schon zu den Opfern gehören könnte. Die Frauen sind gleichermaßen abgestumpft und tragen ihre Streitigkeiten ebenso gewalttätig aus, wie die Männer. Es wirkt geradezu grotesk, wie Amelia die Tage zählt, bis ihr Elternhaus an der Reihe ist, niedergebrannt zu werden, nun ja, Troubles eben. Dass dies nicht ohne Spuren bleiben kann, gerade auch weil selbst innerhalb der Familie keine Loyalität zu erwarten ist, verwundert nicht. Die Spuren der Verwüstung ziehen sich zwar in anderer Art, aber nicht weniger heftig durch ihr Erwachsenenleben.

Die Geschichte Amelias überspannt mehrere Jahrzehnte, es sind kurze Kapitel, nur Episoden, die jedoch eindrücklich nachwirken. Sie erscheinen wie Flashbacks, böse Erinnerungen, die sich eingebrannt haben und die Amelia nicht mehr los wird. Narben, die sie zeichnen und eine von vielen Geschichten eines Landes im andauernden Ausnahmezustand erzählen.
#AnnaBurns #Amelia #Roman #Rezension

Bewertung vom 17.05.2022
Die Winde des Ararat
Zypkin, Leonid

Die Winde des Ararat


sehr gut

Der Berg Ararat, ein ruhender Vulkan im türkisch-armenisch-iranisch-aserbaidschanischen Grenzgebiet, ist das Ziel einer Auslandsreise von Boris Lwowitsch und seiner Frau Tanja. Aufgeregt sind sie ob der Eindrücke der Fremde, wo alles so anders verläuft als in der sowjetischen Hauptstadt, wo der Jurist und die Verwaltungsangestellte angesehene Leute sind. Aber was soll man auch erwarten, fernab des Machtzentrums, wo sich die Menschen verdächtig verhalten und sogar erdreisten Boris und Tanja kurzerhand aus dem Hotel zu werfen. Eine Reise mit Hindernissen, die jedoch auch zeigt, was möglich sein könnte, in einem anderen Land, in einem anderen Leben.

Der russische Mediziner und Autor Leonid Borissowitsch Zypkin schrieb weitgehend für die Schublade, nachdem sein Sohn und dessen Frau aus der Sowjetunion ausgewandert waren und der Autor mit einem Veröffentlichungsverbot belegt wurde. Sein bekanntester Roman „Ein Sommer in Baden-Baden“ musste über Bekannte außer Landes geschmuggelt werden und wurde in New York veröffentlicht, nur eine Woche bevor Zypkin einem Herzanfall erlag. „Die Winde des Ararat“ entstand unter dem Titel „Norartakir“ bereits in den 1970ern, jetzt erstmals in deutscher Übersetzung.

Eines der Kapitel ist mit „Rache“ überschrieben, was symptomatisch für den Roman ist. Boris und Tanja gehören zu jenen, denen es im sowjetischen Moskau gut geht, die sich Auslandsreisen erlauben können. Doch sie können nicht schätzen, welches Glück sie haben und so rächt sich die fremde Welt an ihnen. Das System, das sie noch verteidigen, wendet sich gegen sie und trifft sie mit voller Härte, indem sie ihr Zimmer für eine Gruppe unbedeutender Menschen räumen müssen und zu Bittstellern werden.

Das Buch als Ganzes kann als Rache des Autors gegen das Land gelesen werden, das ihm das Veröffentlichen untersagte. Das Land war festgefahren wie Boris und Tanja, begrenzt im Blick, unfähig sich zu öffnen und zu entwickeln.

Literatur aus dem inneren Exil, da das äußere verwehrt blieb. Heute ein lesenswertes Zeitzeugnis.

Bewertung vom 17.05.2022
Betrug
Sigurdardóttir, Lilja

Betrug


ausgezeichnet

Nach zwei schwierigen Einsätzen in einem Ebolagebiet und Syrien kehrt Úrsúla zurück nach Island zu ihrem Mann und den beiden Kindern. Als man ihr interimsweise den Posten der Innenministerin anbietet, kann sie nicht ablehnen und wird schon am ersten Tag mit einem Vertuschungsfall bei der Polizei konfrontiert. Sie will ihre Arbeit besser machen als die Vorgänger, doch die Politik ist ein Haifischbecken und man hat nur auf neues Futter gewartet. Es dauert nicht lange, bis sie Drohungen an ihrem Auto findet, bis plötzlich der Mörder ihres Vaters auftaucht und bis ihr fragiles Privatleben gänzlich aus dem Runder zu laufen droht. Kommt die toughe Frau, die glaubte, schon alles gesehen zu haben, jetzt in ihrer beschaulichen Heimat an den Rand ihrer Grenzen?

Nach der Reykjavík Trilogie nun ein Standalone-Thriller der mit Theaterstücken bekannt gewordenen Autorin Lilja Sigurðardóttir. In „Betrug“ führt sie ihre Protagonistin in die schmutzige Welt der Politik ein, die von Korruption und Frauenfeindlichkeit geprägt ist – auch einem Land, das international eher wie alle nordischen Länder für egalitär gehalten wird. Aus ganz unterschiedlichen Richtungen scheinen die Angriffe zu kommen, wie diese zusammenhängen und wem man glauben und vertrauen kann, bleibt lange im Dunkeln. Ein spannender Fall für eine starke Frau, die auch Schwächen zeigen darf.

Úrsúla ist von Idealismus geprägt, sie zieht es in die Gebiete, wo die Lage am prekärsten ist und hat keine Angst, sich selbst auch großer Gefahr auszusetzen. Was soll dann auf Island Großes drohen? Sie übernimmt den Posten als Ministerin in der Überzeugung, etwas besser machen zu können, muss aber schnell erkennen, dass ihr Handlungsspielraum begrenzt ist. Und erleben, dass sie besonders als Frau Anfeindungen ausgesetzt ist. Es sind viele kleine Nadelstiche, die sie aushalten muss, während sie ihre Erlebnisse aus Afrika und Syrien noch nicht verarbeitet hat. Auch der brutale Tod ihres Vaters in ihrer Kindheit verfolgt sie nach wie vor.

Was mich besonders überzeugte, war, dass sie zwar zunächst noch versucht, über einen Schutzpanzer emotional nichts an sich heranzulassen, dann aber doch einsieht, dass ein Psychologe und ein offenes Gespräch ein Weg aus dem Teufelskreis sein kann. Eine starke Persönlichkeit besticht eher dadurch, dass sie durchdacht mit Problemen umgeht als dass sie als Einzelkämpfer versucht, nichts an ihrem Image kratzen zu lassen. Eine Facette, die man auch in Romanen bis dato eher selten findet.

Die politischen Verstrickungen sind clever inszeniert und lassen die Zusammenhänge nicht gleich erkennen. Die Spannung zieht sich so geschickt durch die Handlung und muss nicht unnötig durch actiongeladene Szenen aufrechterhalten werden.

Ein überzeugender Fall, der vor allem durch die Figuren und einen komplexen Fall besticht.

Bewertung vom 08.05.2022
Wild Fires (eBook, ePUB)
Jai, Sophie

Wild Fires (eBook, ePUB)


gut

It is the death of her cousin Chevy that brings Cassandra from London back to Toronto where her family is based after having left Trinidad. But she not only returns to the funeral but to a whole history of her family that suddenly pops up again. Stories she had forgotten but now remembers, things which have always been unsaid despite that fact that everybody knew them and secrets that now surface in the big house in Florence Street where the tension is growing day by day. The sisters and aunts find themselves in an exceptional emotional state that cracks open unhealed wounds which add to the ones that have come with the death of Chevy.

Sophie Jai was herself born in Trinidad just like her protagonist and grew up in Toronto, “Wild Fires” is her first novel and was published in 2021. It centres around a family in grief, but also a family between two countries and also between the past and the present and things that have never been addressed between the members. Having been away for some time allows Cassandra a role a bit of an outsider and she sees things of her family she has never understood.

The author wonderfully interweaves the present story of the family gathering at the Toronto home to mourn the loss and Cassandra’s childhood recollections and well-known family stories. Thus, we get to know the deceased and his role in the family web. Like Chevy’s story, also the aspects that link but also separate the generations of sisters are uncovered thus exposing long avoided conflicts.

The novel raises the questions if you can ever flee from the family bonds and how to deal with what happened in the past and has never openly be spoken out loud and discussed. Sophie Jai finds the perfect words to express the nuances in the atmosphere and paces the plot according to the characters’ increasingly conflicting mood.

I liked how the characters and their story unfolds, yet, I would have preferred a more accelerated pace and at the beginning, I struggled to understand the connection between them which was a bit confusing.