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"Shipwrecks are junction points of history. In seeking to make sense of the submerged material culture found in shipwrecks, this book explores maritime-related stories that shaped the Midwest and the nation during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In shipwrecks, we find stories of the frontier, the environment, immigration, politics, and the rise of large-scale agriculture, lumbering, and heavy industry. Individually and collectively, the chapters that comprise this book also place the Great Lakes against a broader background of international and national maritime processes that…mehr

Produktbeschreibung
"Shipwrecks are junction points of history. In seeking to make sense of the submerged material culture found in shipwrecks, this book explores maritime-related stories that shaped the Midwest and the nation during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. In shipwrecks, we find stories of the frontier, the environment, immigration, politics, and the rise of large-scale agriculture, lumbering, and heavy industry. Individually and collectively, the chapters that comprise this book also place the Great Lakes against a broader background of international and national maritime processes that shaped the Upper Midwest during the 19th and early 20th centuries. For those interested in the Wisconsin or Midwestern history, yet unfamiliar with ships and the historical power of water, this book will also provide exciting new perspectives for understanding the past"--
Autorenporträt
John Odin Jensen has studied North American maritime frontier shipwrecks from the Grand Banks of Newfoundland to the edges of the Bering Sea. Born into a Norwegian-American seafaring family in Alaska, he began his maritime career working alongside his father and brother in the commercial fisheries in the 1970s, a time and place where shipwreck and death at sea were an accepted part of life. As a former crab boat captain and a shipwreck survivor, Jensen brings deep professional experience and personal sympathy to the study of the North American mariners, ships, and shipwrecks. His more than thirty years of Great Lakes experience began with a position as an engineer/deckhand aboard the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee research vessel Neeskay and continued with many seasons surveying shipwrecks as a professional underwater archaeologist with the Wisconsin Historical Society. In addition to his early seagoing education, Jensen earned a BA in history from Lawrence University, an MA in maritime history and underwater archaeology from East Carolina University, and MS and PhD degrees in history from Carnegie Mellon University. He is on the faculty of the department of history at the University of West Florida.