Quentin Skinner - Palonen, Kari
  • Broschiertes Buch

Jetzt bewerten

This book is the first comprehensive exposition of the work of one of the most important intellectual historians and political theorists writing today. Quentin Skinner s treatment of political theory as a dimension of political life marks a revolutionary move in the historical as well as th philosophical study of political thought. Skinner brings the study of political theory closer to the language of agents and treats theorists as politicians of a special kind. This is as true of his accounts of his contemporaries, such as Rawls, Rorty, Geertz and Habermas, as it is of his interpretation…mehr

Produktbeschreibung

This book is the first comprehensive exposition of the work of one of the most important intellectual historians and political theorists writing today.

Quentin Skinner s treatment of political theory as a dimension of political life marks a revolutionary move in the historical as well as the philosophical study of political thought. Skinner brings the study of political theory closer to the language of agents and treats theorists as politicians of a special kind. This is as true of his accounts of his contemporaries, such as Rawls, Rorty, Geertz and Habermas, as it is of his interpretations of classical thinkers such as Machiavelli and Hobbes. Skinner has become internationally renowned for this approach, which ties together historical and contemporary analysis in order to integrate the study of the past and the present, and which tries fully to uncover the historical context and development of key concepts in political theory such as freedom and the state.

This volume charts Skinner s work from the early 1960s right up to the present, including his most recent studies in the theory of persuasive speech, and is organized around five major themes: history, linguistic action, political thought, liberty and rhetoric. It pays particular attention to Skinner s work in relation to that of continental thinkers, especially Max Weber and Reinhart Koselleck.

The book will be essential reading for students and scholars of political and social theory, history, philosophy and cultural studies.
  • Produktdetails
  • Key Contemporary Thinkers
  • Verlag: Blackwell Publishers
  • Seitenzahl: 216
  • 2003
  • Ausstattung/Bilder: 216 pages; 229 x 152 mm
  • Englisch
  • Abmessung: 226mm x 173mm x 17mm
  • Gewicht: 322g
  • ISBN-13: 9780745628578
  • ISBN-10: 0745628575
  • Best.Nr.: 13605555

Autorenporträt

Dr. Kari Palonen ist Professor am Department of Political Science der Universität Jyväskylä, Finnland.

Inhaltsangabe

Chapter 1. Introduction.
1.1. A Revolution in the Study of Political Thought.

1.2. A Political Reading.

Chapter 2. History as an Argument.

2.1. Death of Political Philosophy?.

2.2. The Defence of the Historian: Laslett and Pocock.

2.3. The 'historical' as a criterion.

2.4. The Politics of History.

Chapter 3. Theories as Moves.

3.1. Intelligibility of Politics as Activity.

3.2. The Action Perspective on Political Thought.

3.3. Ideas and Concepts as Moves in Argument.

3.4. Conventions and intentions.

3.5. Legitimation of Action.

3.6. The Innovating Ideologist.

3.7. Linguistic Action and its Legitimation.

Chapter 4. The Foundations: a History of Theory Politics.

4.1. Genres of Studying Political Thought.

4.2. Why "Foundations"?.

4.3. The Matrix of Questions.

4.4. Ideologies and Legitimation.

4.5. The Formation of the Concept of the State.

4.6. From the History of Ideas Towards a History of Concepts.

4.7. The Skinnerian Revolution.

Chapter 5. Rethinking Political Liberty.

5.1. Liberty as a Contested Concept Par Excellence.

5.2. Revising the Conceptual History of Liberty.

5.3. Liberty of the City-Republics.

5.4. Machiavelli as a Philosopher of Liberty.

5.5. Hobbes on Natural Liberty and the Liberty of Subjects.

5.6. The Neo-roman Theorists: Liberty vs. Dependence.

5.7. Intervention in the Contemporary Debate.

5.8. A Profile on the History and Theory of Liberty.

Chapter 6. From Philosophy to Rhetoric.

6.1. The Rise of Rhetoric.

6.2. Rhetorical Philosophy: Wittgenstein and Austin.

6.3. Skinner's Critique of Philosophy.

6.4. Rhetoric and Philosophy in Hobbes.

6.5. The rhetorical Culture of the Renaissance.

6.6. Rhetoric and the Critique of Philosophy.

6.7. Conceptual Change: from Speech Acts to Rhetoric.

6.8. Skinner and Rhetoric Studies Today.

Chapter 7. Quentin Skinner as a Contemporary Thinker.

7.1 The Intellectual Profile.

7.2. A vision of Time.

References.

Chapter 1. Introduction.

1.1. A Revolution in the Study of Political Thought.

1.2. A Political Reading.

Chapter 2. History as an Argument.

2.1. Death of Political Philosophy?.

2.2. The Defence of the Historian: Laslett and Pocock.

2.3. The 'historical' as a criterion.

2.4. The Politics of History.

Chapter 3. Theories as Moves.

3.1. Intelligibility of Politics as Activity.

3.2. The Action Perspective on Political Thought.

3.3. Ideas and Concepts as Moves in Argument.

3.4. Conventions and intentions.

3.5. Legitimation of Action.

3.6. The Innovating Ideologist.

3.7. Linguistic Action and its Legitimation.

Chapter 4. The Foundations: a History of TheoryPolitics.

4.1. Genres of Studying Political Thought.

4.2. Why "Foundations"?.

4.3. The Matrix of Questions.

4.4. Ideologies and Legitimation.

4.5. The Formation of the Concept of the State.

4.6. From the History of Ideas Towards a History ofConcepts.

4.7. The Skinnerian Revolution.

Chapter 5. Rethinking Political Liberty.

5.1. Liberty as a Contested Concept Par Excellence.

5.2. Revising the Conceptual History of Liberty.

5.3. Liberty of the City-Republics.

5.4. Machiavelli as a Philosopher of Liberty.

5.5. Hobbes on Natural Liberty and the Liberty of Subjects.

5.6. The Neo-roman Theorists: Liberty vs. Dependence.

5.7. Intervention in the Contemporary Debate.

5.8. A Profile on the History and Theory of Liberty.

Chapter 6. From Philosophy to Rhetoric.

6.1. The Rise of Rhetoric.

6.2. Rhetorical Philosophy: Wittgenstein and Austin.

6.3. Skinner's Critique of Philosophy.

6.4. Rhetoric and Philosophy in Hobbes.

6.5. The rhetorical Culture of the Renaissance.

6.6. Rhetoric and the Critique of Philosophy.

6.7. Conceptual Change: from Speech Acts to Rhetoric.

6.8. Skinner and Rhetoric Studies Today.

Chapter 7. Quentin Skinner as a Contemporary Thinker.

7.1 The Intellectual Profile.

7.2. A vision of Time.

References.

Rezensionen

'Skinner and Palonen between them have explained, more deeply than anyone, the relation between writing the history of political thoughts and thinking about politics in history.' John Pocock, Professor Emeritus, John Hopkins University

'Kari Palonen's impressive knowledge of twentieth-century European historiography creates an appropriately broad canvas for this fine study of the Cambridge contextual historian Quentin Skinner as a political theorist in the grand tradition. Palonen shows to what degree Skinner's projects belong to the world post Nietzsche and post Wittgenstein, which give priority to "life" and the "lived experience" over theory and scholastic history (or historicism). For the modern homo politicus no longer speaks " for eternity", but as a person of his/her own time. It is in this very special sense that context and text belong together: as the ground, and perhaps the only ground, against which human actions now have meaning'. Patricia Springborg, University of Sydney
'Skinner and Palonen between them have explained, more deeplythan anyone, the relation between writing the history of politicalthoughts and thinking about politics in history.' JohnPocock, Professor Emeritus, John Hopkins University

'Kari Palonen's impressive knowledge oftwentieth-century European historiography creates an appropriatelybroad canvas for this fine study of the Cambridge contextualhistorian Quentin Skinner as a political theorist in the grandtradition. Palonen shows to what degree Skinner's projectsbelong to the world post Nietzsche and post Wittgenstein, whichgive priority to "life" and the "livedexperience" over theory and scholastic history (orhistoricism). For the modern homo politicus no longer speaks" for eternity", but as a person of his/her own time.It is in this very special sense that context and text belongtogether: as the ground, and perhaps the only ground, against whichhuman actions now have meaning'. Patricia Springborg,University of Sydney